Brian Kahn

Poetry’s been around a long time. Jazz, on the other hand, is a relatively recent American original. So why would jazz composer Wayne Horvitz write music in honor of a poet? Specifically, about Richard Hugo, perhaps Montana’s most renowned practitioner of the art? Wayne Horvitz explains on this episode of "Home Ground Radio,” listen now.

Most Americans believe the rule of law is essential to justice. But opinion polls show that the profession essential to the application of law - that of lawyer - is not held in high esteem. Knowing that, why would a smart, young woman want to become one? Kim Clement made that choice. She joins Brian Kahn on this episode of "Home Ground Radio" to talk about her law career, and what followed.

Homeless people make us uncomfortable. We wonder what’s gone wrong, but hesitate to cross an unspoken line, or extend a helping hand. Family Promise, a faith-based initiative, does both. And it works. Nick Zullo, director of Family Promise of Helena joins Brian Kahn on this episode of "Home Ground Radio".

As a boy growing up on Montana ranches, Dan Ellison was fascinated by birds. He decided he wanted to learn to fly. The result? From flying search and rescue helicopters to working for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he's had a highly interesting life. He joins Brian Kahn on this episode of "Home Ground Radio".

Djamal Pullom was born of mixed race parents in a part of Kentucky where that was unacceptable. He grew up a loner before finding his family—in the United States Navy. Pullom joins Brian Kahn on this episode of "Home Ground Radio"

U.S. Senator Mike Mansfield (Left) and Everett Dirksen conversing.

It's hard to describe the career of this program's guest, but let me take a stab at it. Early on, grocery delivery boy. A little later, sailor, soldier, marine, Montana miner, history professor, United States congressman, United States senator, Senate majority leader, statesman, ambassador. You must have guessed by now, I'm talking about Mike Mansfield.

Without water, we perish. For 30 years, the Confederated Salish-Kootenai Tribes and the state of Montana have disagreed about tribal water right claims. But this year the legislature approved a comprehensive water rights agreement. Melissa Hornbein was one of the lead attorneys in the negotiations, working for Montana DNRC and the Montana Reserved Water Rights Commission. Hornbein talks with Brian Kahn about the legal and emotional challenges of negotiating the Flathead water compact.

Montana's national reputation is based on who we are and where we live, not on what we make. Quite a few people are putting their hearts into trying to change that. Brian Kahn visits the Made in Montana Trade Show, where he roams the booths, talking with artists and vendors about how they make and market their products.

What Drives A Montana Lobbyist?

Jun 17, 2015

Between them, Mona Jamison and Stuart Doggett have almost sixty years' experience lobbying in the Montana Legislature. "Lobbyist" isn't a word that wins any popularity contest. Why do they do it?

Sheila McShane

Sheila McShane directs Clinica Maxeña, part of the Guatemala Mission of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Helena, Montana. McShane arrived in Guatemala 1966, one of two young American RNs who constituted the only trained medical staff at the new mission. The presence of electricity, a rarity in the region, determined the clinic's location.