Brian Kahn

courtesy of Deep Springs College

Nearly one hundred years ago, L.L. Nunn, an electrical pioneer and the manager of a Colorado power company, founded a two-year college for young men in California's Deep Springs Valley. Deep Springs College isn't the typical American junior college: it's tiny, with just twenty-six students. No one pays tuition or fees.  It's located on a remote cattle ranch and alfalfa farm. The student-faculty ratio is 5:1.

Flickr user, Meet the Media Guru

"My way of learning was never through a book - it was always through experience. Going out and finding things and thinking about them is basically how I have learned everything. When it comes to teaching a student something, I want that student to do the same thing. I think reading is overrated, quite frankly, and I think there's no reason to read a book and learn about someone else's idea. I think it's more important to experience something and have your own idea."

Jim Winstead

Greg and Susan Gianforte started a hi-tech business in a spare bedroom of their home in Bozeman. Fourteen years later, they sold RightNow Technologies, Inc. to Oracle for $1.5 billion.

Big money is pouring into judges' elections. So how would you feel if the judge deciding your case had received $3.5 million from your opponent? Hugh Caperton knows. With attorney James Sample, he took his case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Dewey Vanderhoff

Carrie La Seur is a seventh generation descendant of homesteaders who came to Montana in 1864. As a child, Carrie was enthralled by stories of Montana life in the 19th and early 20th centuries. But her adult life as a lawyer has created a deep divide. To try to resolve it, she wrote a novel.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 9/23/14)

In the midst of rapid change, history can seem so...out of date. But a visit with Jennifer Bottomly-O'Looney and Kirby Lambert at the Montana Historical Society shows why it matters.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 9/16/14)

Hunter J. Causey

Wildlife biologist Doug Chadwick, author of numerous books and articles about natural history and conservation, and longtime resident of grizzly bear habitat in Montana, describes himself as a "bear groupie."  Ursos arctos gobiensis, a Gobi Desert sub-species of grizzly bear,

courtesy of Jim Hagenbarth

The settlers who came to Montana relied on livestock for their livelihoods and the lives. More than 150 years later, technology has removed most of us from the ranching life. But not Jim Hagenbarth. Far more than most, he understands the needs, complexities and rewards of ranching.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 8/19/14)

Dr. Jonah Western

Jul 14, 2014
David Western

7/15/14: This week on Home Ground Radio: Dr. Jonah Western grew up in the 1950s on the "elephant trail" of southern Tanzania, where elephants, their habitat, their hunters - and their protectors - enjoyed a last bastion. Western became a scientist, studying conflict and co-existence between wildlife and humans.

Montana DPHHS

7/8/14: This week on "Home Ground Radio:" Montana's largest stage agency employs 3,100 people, overseeing 2,500 contracts and 150 programs. What it is?  Who runs it? Meet Richard Opper, Director of Montana's Department of Public Health and Human Services.

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