Buffalo Field Campaign

Bison at the Stephens Creek Capture facility north of Yellowstone Park in 2015.
Jim Peaco (CC-BY-NC

A bison advocate and a journalist are suing the National Park Service over access to Yellowstone National Park’s bison capture facility.

Bison on the move near Yellowstone's northern border.
Amy Martin

Two bison cows and one calf were wounded during the Montana bison hunt today on the northern border of Yellowstone National Park.

Bison at the Stephens Creek Capture facility north of Yellowstone Park in 2015.
Jim Peaco (CC-BY-NC

Federal, state and tribal officials have agreed to kill as many as 600 to 900 Yellowstone National Park bison this year.

Yellowstone bison may get more room to roam after today's decision by Governor Steve Bullock.
(PD)

Governor Steve Bullock today issued a decision that would allow wild bison from Yellowstone National Park to roam in portions of Montana north and west of the Park year round. The decision potentially breaks a longstanding impasse in a wildlife conflict that's dragged on for decades.

Cow bison with a newly born calf in Yellowstone National Park
Neal Herbert - Yellowstone National Park (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone National Park might tolerate thousands more bison by 2017, or perhaps hundreds fewer. State and federal wildlife managers are developing a new Yellowstone bison management plan and several options are on the table.

Yellowstone bison often leave the confines of the park in the winter for lower elevations in Montana.
Jim Peaco (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone National Park has started capturing bison near the park's north entrance and bison advocates have sued to stop it.

Disease management and carrying capacity are at the center of the operation.

Park spokesman Al Nash says a total of 800 to 900 bison that migrate out of the park could be removed.

"We're doing so to be able to approach the target bison population and to see if we can reduce the potential for a mass-migration of bison into Montana where there is still some limited tolerance."

Josh Burnham-cc-by-2.0

Bison management always spurs passionate debate in Montana and a meeting tomorrow in Great Falls will consider whether wild herds should be established outside of Yellowstone National Park.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is considering that possibility.

Conservationist Keith Aune says he thinks Montana can develop a good plan. Aune's director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's bison programs.

lowjumpingfrog/flickr

National Park Service officials are announcing a partnership with the state of Montana to consider changes to managing bison in and around Yellowstone National Park.

Hundreds of bison wander into the state from the park’s northern boundary during many winters.

Livestock owners worry about the animals damaging property and spreading disease.

The Park Service and the state have been operating under their current Bison Management Plan since 2001.

The agencies think it may be time for an update.