MTPR

Center For Biological Diversity

Grizzly bear.
(PD)

Federal officials say they'll review the recent lifting of protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears in light of a court ruling that retained protections for gray wolves in the Great Lakes.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday that it is seeking public comment on the court ruling given the possible implications for an estimated 700 bears in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The M-44 consists of a capsule holder, a cyanide capsule, a spring-activated ejector, and a stake. When triggered they propel one gram of lethal sodium cyanide into an animal's mouth.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

Predator-killing cyanide traps will no longer be used on public lands in Colorado, pending further study. Colorado is now the second state to take a closer look at use of the devices, also known as M-44 cyanide bombs.

These are spring-loaded devices that resemble sprinklers. When triggered they propel one gram of lethal sodium cyanide into an animal's mouth.

Grizzly bear.
Flickr user Nathan Rupert (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

The Interior Department Thursday said it will lift Endangered Species Act protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park region.

Those protections have been in place for more than 40 years.

The M-44 consists of a capsule holder, a cyanide capsule, a spring-activated ejector, and a stake. When triggered they propel one gram of lethal sodium cyanide into an animal's mouth.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

Three months after a predator-killing cyanide trap sickened a teenage boy in Idaho and killed his dog, the federal government is launching an expanded review of the devices.

Keystone Pipeline pumping station in Nebraska.
Flickr user shannonpatrick17 (CC-BY-2)

It’s springtime in Montana and that’s keeping Glendive-area farmer Dena Hoff plenty busy these days:

"Oh yes, we’re lambing. It’s been crazy," Hoff says.

Hoff, an irrigated farmer on the Yellowstone River, is also keeping tabs on the Trump administration's activities in Washington D.C. Hoff is particularly disappointed by the President’s decision last week to approve a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline:

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