MTPR

China

Nate Hegyi / YPR

Republican Senator Steve Daines hosted Chinese ambassador Chui Tiankai at a ranch near Belgrade today.  The two were there to talk … cattle. In June, China lifted their 14 year-old ban on importing U.S. beef.

USDA photo by Keith Weller

Montana cattle producers say they’re now a big step closer to getting their beef back into the potentially lucrative Chinese market. American beef has been locked out of China ever since a 2003 Mad Cow Disease scare in Washington State.

Sen. Steve Daines.
Courtesy photo

Montana Senator Steve Daines says he thinks Asia respects President Donald Trump’s recent hardline stances in North Korea and Syria.

"In other words, the peace through strength doctrine of Ronald Reagan is starting to be heard a bit more over in Asia," says Daines. "We have a president now that I think is regaining the respect of the world to its leadership."

Sen. Daines hand-carried four Montana steaks and a photo of Fred Wacker of Miles City and his cows to China and presented them to Premier Li Keqiang to underscore the importance of opening Chinese markets to U.S. beef imports.
Courtesy Senator Daines

U.S. Senator Steve Daines says he thinks American beef is almost back on the menu in China.

"We’re now engaged at the highest levels in their government and telling them this is a very important issue for the United States," Daines says.

Cattle
(PD)

China is one of the top beef-consuming nations in the world. But American producers have been locked out of that lucrative market since a Mad Cow Disease scare 13 years ago.

That changed this week.

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