MTPR

China

USDA photo by Keith Weller

Montana cattle producers say they’re now a big step closer to getting their beef back into the potentially lucrative Chinese market. American beef has been locked out of China ever since a 2003 Mad Cow Disease scare in Washington State.

Sen. Steve Daines.
Courtesy photo

Montana Senator Steve Daines says he thinks Asia respects President Donald Trump’s recent hardline stances in North Korea and Syria.

"In other words, the peace through strength doctrine of Ronald Reagan is starting to be heard a bit more over in Asia," says Daines. "We have a president now that I think is regaining the respect of the world to its leadership."

Sen. Daines hand-carried four Montana steaks and a photo of Fred Wacker of Miles City and his cows to China and presented them to Premier Li Keqiang to underscore the importance of opening Chinese markets to U.S. beef imports.
Courtesy Senator Daines

U.S. Senator Steve Daines says he thinks American beef is almost back on the menu in China.

"We’re now engaged at the highest levels in their government and telling them this is a very important issue for the United States," Daines says.

Cattle
(PD)

China is one of the top beef-consuming nations in the world. But American producers have been locked out of that lucrative market since a Mad Cow Disease scare 13 years ago.

That changed this week.

'Clean Coal' Development A Top Priority For China

Aug 27, 2015
Montana Activists Rally Against Coal Trains
Flickr user Erin Kinney (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

China is not likely to give up using coal anytime in the near future. That was the message from a top energy official during a conference on clean coal technology this week in Billings.

Former Montana Senator, and current Ambassador to China, Max Baucus returned to his home state for the first time in over a year Monday night.

Baucus addressed a Montana Chamber of Commerce gathering in Helena. He said China's economic output is on track to surpass the U.S. in about 10 years, but that means increased opportunities for some Montana industries, such as energy. Montana can supply China with coal, and with technology to burn that coal cleanly, now that China has agreed to slow its growth in carbon emissions.

03/01/2015 - America owes $6 trillion to China, the War on Terror has stripped us of the moral high ground, and our middle class is no longer the world's most affluent.  Are our best days behind us or should the world still bet on America?

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1251-declinists-be-damned-bet-on-america

Tea II

Jul 5, 2014

7/5/14: This week on The Plant Detective: They may have different flavors but black, green, white and oolong teas all come from the same plant: Camellia sinensis. They're just processed differently; black tea is fermented, green tea isn't. Unfermented green tea is especially high in catechins, those antioxidants that scavenge the blood for free radicals and are associated with lower rates of atherosclerosis.

Tea I

Jun 28, 2014

6/28/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" According to archaeologists, human use of tea,  Camellia sinensis, goes back 500,000 years.  The flavonoids in tea are more effective antioxidants than Vitamins C or E - they seem to boost immunity and protect against cavities and ultraviolet rays. More research is needed to find out if tea's flavonoids protect against cardiovascular disease and certain kinds of cancer.

American Ginseng

Jun 21, 2014

6/21/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:"  Even today, many elderly Chinese still prefer a good ginseng root to health insurance. American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is used to aid digestion, treat diabetes, boost immunity, and balance qi, or life energy.