Clip of the Week

An audio highlight from this week's local programming.

In our Clip of the Week, Kim Anderson, Associate Director of Humanities Montana, talks about what makes the Montana Festival of the Book so special: community.

The festival is happening October 9 - 11 in Missoula, and includes a poetry slam, a special edition of the wildly popular storytelling event "Tell Us Something," a 15th anniversary gala event, and a roster of best-selling authors, including James Lee Burke, Pete Fromm, Walter Kirn, Gwen Florio, and many others.

State and federal wildlife officials are investigating the shooting death of a male grizzly bear west of Whitefish.

"In this city dedicated to the bear, I haven't seen a bear yet. Except in the airport lounge, where one such specimen is stuffed. Do you know the story?"

In our Clip of the Week, Poet Eduardo Chirinos, a professor at the University of Montana-Missoula, writes about bears - real, symbolic, and stuffed.

Listen to the entire episode of "Reflections West" featuring Eduardo Chrinos and Linds Sanders. Or hear more on your radio every Tuesday 8:30 p.m. and Wednesday 3:55 p.m.

Freedom Is A 3,100 Mile Solo Hike

Sep 25, 2014
Clay Scott

"I can't imagine a better existence," says Kayla Murchison. She's nearing the end of a 3,100 mile solo hike on the Continental Divide Trail. After 4 1/2 months walking from Mexico to Canada, she's "hard as nails", and "ready to take on anything."

In our Clip of the Week Kayla talks about the simplicity, freedom and beauty of life on the trail.

What Can We Learn From Wildlife?

Sep 18, 2014
Hunter J. Causey

Humans like to believe we're on the top of the pyramid when it comes to intelligence. Wildlife biologist Douglas Chadwick isn't so sure.

In our Clip of the Week, Chadwick talks about his experience working with big-brained animals, and explains two great reasons for studying wildlife.

'Okay to think your own thoughts...'

Sep 11, 2014

"Okay to take pictures. Okay to sit on turtle. Okay to let your dog out. Okay to think your own thoughts (crackpot though they might well be)." These words greet all who visit the domain of 95-year-old Montana artist Bill Ohrmann.