MTPR

elk

State wildlife and livestock officials say an elk captured in southwest Montana tested positive for exposure to brucellosis.

This is the first time a positive test was found in the Tendoy Mountains Southwest of Dillon, said officials from the Montana Department of Livestock.

Cow elk.
PD

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Government biologists say elk numbers in the northern part of Yellowstone National Park are at their highest level in more than a decade.

Results of a two-day winter survey released Wednesday showed more than 7,500 elk in Yellowstone and areas of Montana north of the park. That's up more than 40 percent compared to 2017 and marks the highest population level since 2005.

Elk at a feed ground in Wyoming.
USGS (PD)

The Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission sent a letter to Wyoming last week asking wildlife managers to reconsider the use of winter feeding grounds in order to help prevent chronic wasting disease.

Dan Vermillion, the chairman of the commission, said "it’s not our position to tell them what to do. It’s not our position to tell them how to manage their wildlife. We’re just asking them as a neighbor to help us."

Mule deer.
(PD)

A mule deer buck harvested south of Billings in October has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease, officials confirmed Wednesday. CWD is deadly and contagious to deer, elk and moose.

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks says a sample collected from the hunter-killed deer 10 miles southeast of Bridger tested positive during an initial round of testing. A second, more thorough test is now being done on the sample at Colorado State University to confirm the presence of the infection.

Mule deer.
(PD)

Big game hunting season is now underway, and this year Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is doing more than ever before to look for Chronic Wasting Disease. The agency has a million dollars to spend on disease surveillance and testing over the next five years.

Emily Almberg is a disease ecologist with FWP. She says it’s inevitable that the disease will be discovered in Montana any day now.

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