Ellen Baumler

Large ponderosa pine tree.
(PD)

Historian Ellen Baumler recalls a stark piece of Montana’s haunted history, Helena’s Hangman’s Tree.

John Keene was the first recorded victim who breathed his last on Helena’s infamous Hangman’s Tree. The Murderer’s Tree, as it was first known, stood at the head of Dry Gulch. Those who knew it well recalled that the ancient ponderosa pine had massive lower branches that tangled in weird contortions. The branches, bleak and devoid of foliage, protruded some twenty feet from its gnarled, moss-covered trunk. Miners, needing to cut smaller logs for cabins, let it stand.

Ellen Baumler & Will James: Tales Plowed Under

Mar 10, 2015
Amon Carter Museum

Historian Ellen Baumler tells how Western artist Charlie Russell got his beloved horse, Monte, the bay pinto known originally as Paint:

6/17/14 & 6/18/14: This week on "Reflections West:" Historian Ellen Baumler, who witnessed Governor Brian Schweitzer's posthumous pardon of the 76 men and 3 women convicted of sedition under Montana's notorious 1918 law, reflects on WWI hysteria. Clem Work speculates on the convictions of two of the pardoned, William and Janet Smith.