MTPR

entrepreneurship

The Scott family continues to run the publicly traded, 120 office, six state, $12 billion First Interstate Bank system out of Billings, Montana as if it was still a small town bank. On this episode of "Can Do," James Scott, Jr., grandson of First Interstate Bank founder Homer Scott and son of chairman James Scott, Sr., talks about the history of the bank, as well as who and what the bank finances and invests in, and how you can succeed in today's competitive landscape.

Montana Public Radio has released a new podcast spotlighting Montana’s entrepreneurial spirit.

"Can Do: Lessons From Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs” is a podcast all about why Montana leads the nation in entrepreneurship and business startups. From cricket farms to romance novels, “Can Do” shares the secrets to business success in Big Sky Country.

Danica Winters: archaeologist; award-winning writer; author of many published books and short stories; marketing and social media guru; founder of a digital publishing services company; sought-after speaker; wife; mother of two. If you think Danica sounds like a superwoman or the heroine of a Harlequin romance novel, you're right. Almost.

Winters is a Montanan and writer for Harlequin. She's a partner at Self Publishing Services, a company with 30 contract employees, and she runs her self-publishing empire from Frenchtown, Montana.

In this episode of "Can Do: Lessons From Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs," Danica Winters joins host Arnie Sherman to share lessons she learned as she developed her writing career and self-publishing service.

The cover of a new report released by the Montana High Tech Business Alliance Monday
Montana High Tech Business Alliance

In the last several years, studies have shown that Montana is hotbed for entrepreneurs, people starting up new companies. A new study released yesterday examined what’s different about the so-called entrepreneurship ecosystem here.

Removing The Dead, Feeding The Living

Sep 5, 2016
Missoula Grain and Vegetable Company
Parker Beckley

Many people work a day job to keep money coming in while they start a new business during evenings and weekends. But 26-year-old Max Smith does just the opposite. To support his day job as a farmer, he works weekends and nights for a funeral home.

Max Smith: The death industry has a phrase for this. It’s called a “remover.”

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