MTPR

Flathead Reservation

A group of 25 college students from Iraq are in Montana, as part of a Young Leaders Exchange Program arranged by the U.S. State Department and the University of Montana.
Natalie Dawson, director of the Wilderness Institute

A group of 25 college students from Iraq are in Montana, as part of a Young Leaders Exchange Program arranged by the U.S. State Department and the University of Montana. The three-week tour is focused on international peace building through studies in environmental and cultural preservation.

Threshold Episode 05: Heirs To The Most Glorious Heritage

Mar 2, 2017
Rob McDonald and Rich Janssen of the CSKT.
Amy Martin

In 1908, the National Bison Range was created by carving 18,000 acres out of Montana's Flathead Reservation. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it is willing to transfer the land back to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. But, a lawsuit has been filed to stop the proposed transfer. In this episode we meet tribal members who feel they are the rightful stewards of the land and the historic bison herd, and others who are trying to stop the transfer.

A legislative proposal to slap a $25 tax on out-of-state bicyclists visiting Montana turns out to be a big joke, but it's going over like a lead ballon.
PD

A proposal to connect existing bike paths in western Montana received widespread support at a meeting on the Flathead Reservation today. The big hurdle now is securing funding.

The proposed 34-mile multi-use path would follow U.S. 93 from its intersection with Interstate 90 to St. Ignatius.

Bison and the National Bison Range.
Josh Burnham-cc-by-2.0

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced it’s assessing future management plans for the National Bison Range, including transferring control to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT).

Montana Supreme Court Temporarily Halts 'Marsy's Law'
(PD)

Lake County Commissioners are asking Montana’s legislature to withdraw from an agreement that lets the state prosecute felonies for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

Voter Voices From The Flathead Reservation

Nov 28, 2016
Morning Star Gopher is an 18 year-old engineering student, and a member of the Blackfeet nation.
Courtesy Lailani Upham

On a recent Friday morning at Pablo Elementary, a public school on the Flathead Indian Reservation, while most kids were in class, a few brave souls agreed to talk to some grown-ups about politics.

Watch: Salish Honor Ancestors In Return To Homeland

Oct 23, 2016
On the 125th anniversary of the forced removal of the Salish from the Bitterroot, a group of Salish people and supporters honored their ancestors with a three-day walk returning to their homeland.
Courtesy Tailyr Irvine (www.tailyrirvine.com)

On the 125th anniversary of the forced removal of the Salish from the Bitterroot, a group of Salish people and supporters honored their ancestors with a three-day walk returning to their homeland.

Salish Walkers Retrace Exodus From The Bitterroot

Oct 13, 2016
Logo of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.
Josh Burnham

Today through Saturday, the Salish Pend d’Oreille tribal community will be remembering their ancestors by retracing their steps. This Saturday will mark 125 years since the Bitterroot Salish were forcibly removed from the Bitterroot Valley, traveling three days to the Flathead Reservation in Arlee.

Audio Pending...

The Salish and Pend d’Orielle Tribes on the Flathead Reservation are trying something new to save their language — an app. The Tribes’ Culture Committee released the app last month.

Tribal Health officials for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes announced on Monday that the over-the-counter drug PlanB will be provided at several locations on the reservation without a prescription.
BGTP (CC-BY-SA-3)

The emergency contraception pill known as Plan B is now available to any female of any age on the Flathead Reservation. Tribal Health officials for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes announced on Monday that the over-the-counter drug will be provided at several locations on the reservation without a prescription.

Richard Hader speaks with CSKT tribal attorney Shane Morigeau at a meeting on the proposed transfer of the National Bison Range.
Nicky Ouellet

  This post has been edited. The National Bison Range is nearly 19,000 acres, not 1,900 acres as originally posted. 

More than 100 people packed into the theater at the Salish Kootenai College Tuesday night to hear about the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes’ proposal to take over management of the National Bison Range from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Fish and Wildlife supports transferring management.

Vance Home Gun and Greg Gianforte talk during the Arlee powwow.
Corin Cates-Carney

During the Arlee Powwow over the 4th of July weekend, Bruce Meyers, the only Native American Republican in Montana’s legislature, stood along the outside of the celebration dance floor introducing his party's candidate for governor.

Corin Cates-Carney

The Republican candidate for Governor made an appearance during the Arlee powwow over the weekend as the GOP reaches out to native voters.

After more than 100 years of federal control, the lands of the National Bison Range may be returned to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.
Amy Martin

After more than 100 years of federal control, the lands of the National Bison Range may be returned to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Last week, the tribes released draft legislation that would transfer authority over the range from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to the CSKT.  

A bill asking for the end of capital punishment was voted down.
Courtesy Two Rivers Authority

In Montana, nearly 40 percent of adults who’ve been to prison end up going back.

On Tuesday state and tribal leaders are meeting with U.S. Department of Justice officials to talk about how to turn that around.

Teri Loring Dahle runs a graphic design company. She attended the conference to network with other native business owners.
Katie Riordan

Some estimate that as much as 90 cents of every dollar that enters Montana’s seven Indian reservations may end up being spent elsewhere. State policy makers like Casey Lozar say that’s because there’s a severe lack of business opportunities on tribal lands, and it’s bleeding local economies dry.

Juneau Launches Reservations Campaign Tour

Apr 20, 2016
Bronte Wittpenn

Congressional candidate Denise Juneau was in Pablo Tuesday to kick off a month-long campaign tour of Montana’s seven Indian reservations.

Juneau said her visit to the Flathead Reservation was as much about talking to potential voters as it was about sending a strong message that their vote counts.

“You know there is power in the native vote and I think that realization is coming to fruition in these communities,” Juneau said.

(PD)

About 13,000 people on the Flathead Reservation were without electricity for several hours longer than expected during a planned power outage this weekend.

Montana Schools are getting half a million dollars in federal grant money to improve math and science instruction.

Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau says a chunk of those funds will go to math programs on the Flathead Reservation. Juneau’s office says over the past five years American Indians’ rate of proficiency in math and science is 30 percent lower than white Montanans.

Life on a reservation can tend toward a pattern of wounds difficult to mend by young natives.

15-year-olds Kianna Finley and Gabby Houle live on the Flathead reservation. They say at times they are surrounded by a discouraging way of living - one of substance abuse and loss.

House Narrowly Approves Flathead Water Compact

Apr 15, 2015

Wednesday afternoon the Montana House narrowly approved the Flathead Reservation Water Compact after more than three hours of debate on the House floor.

Judge James Manley today ruled the portion of the water compact unconstitutional that protects members of a yet-to-be-created water compact board from being sued.
Flickr user Brad Smith (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

The contentious Flathead Reservation water compact appears to be taking the same convoluted path to the House floor as the Medicaid expansion bill did last week.

Flickr, Peggy2012CREATIVELENZ

The Montana State Capitol was bustling with activity Saturday, as literal busloads of people arrived from the Flathead Valley to weigh in on the controversial Flathead Reservation compact that will settle tribal water rights and determine how much water farmers and ranchers of that region will receive in future years.

Flathead Water Compact On Saturday's Legislative Agenda

Apr 10, 2015
Montana capitol, Helena.
William Marcus

The Montana Legislature is holding a special weekend hearing Saturday for the hundreds expected to come to speak their mind on the Salish Kootenai water compact. If passed, the compact would outline water rights on and around the Flathead Reservation.

Montana Tribal Colleges Seek Equality In Funding

Mar 31, 2015

Montana has the most tribal colleges in the country, and it’s the only state with one on every reservation. But together, all seven tribal colleges educate hundreds of non-tribal students as well, many of them white students.

Laura John, a tribal analyst with the Montana Budget and Policy Center says non-Tribal student enrollment in tribal colleges is growing.

"The tribal colleges have seen, overall, a 25 percent increase between 2009 and what’s projected for 2016-2017," according to John.

Eric Whitney

On the calendar it may have been Presidents Day, but for the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday was no holiday.

Steve Jess

This past weekend, about 40 of Montana’s state legislators did something unusual. After a very busy week, they stuck around when they could have gone home.

They spent close to three hours on a Saturday morning in the old Supreme Court chamber of the capitol, at the invitation of Republican Senator Chas Vincent of Libby.

Judge James Manley today ruled the portion of the water compact unconstitutional that protects members of a yet-to-be-created water compact board from being sued.
Flickr user Brad Smith (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

Some of Montana’s most influential agriculture organizations are lining up to support the Flathead water compact.

Yesterday the Montana Stockgrowers Association said it endorses the compact, which is a negotiated settlement between state and federal government and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Right now, ownership of water on the reservation is disputed, and the compact is an attempt to codify who owns and controls the water without having to go to court.

The Flathead Joint Board of Control, the body that represents most irrigators on the Flathead Reservation, is sharply divided over the proposed water compact with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

At a meeting Tuesday, a majority of the board decided to draft a resolution urging the state legislature to reject the proposal. Vice Chairman Jerry Laskody says most of the commissioners feel the state and the tribe have ignored the concerns of irrigators.

As a proposed water compact involving the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes moves closer to consideration in the Montana Legislature, we’re talking to people on all sides of the proposal.

Today we’ll hear from Mark Blasdel of Kalispell, who is leaving his post as Speaker of the House to take a seat in the state Senate. Blasdel opposed the compact that died in the last legislature, and he says he’ll oppose the latest version as well.

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