MTPR

Flathead River

Montana's Flathead Valley from above.
Nicky Ouellet

The Flathead Basin Commission is redefining its role protecting water quality in northwest Montana, after legislators gutted its funding last November and its executive director was fired in February.

The Commission spent much of Wednesday reinventing itself.

View Of The North Fork of The Flathead River Near Ford Cabin.
Flathead National Forest

The Flathead National Forest and Glacier National Park are continuing to seek public input on a new comprehensive river management plan for the three forks of the Flathead River. 

A total of 219 miles of the Flathead are designated under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. The Act was intended to safeguard the special character of certain U.S. rivers. As part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, the Flathead is subject to federal planning to preserve and protect its outstanding natural value, including the various wildlife that call the river home.

View Of The North Fork of The Flathead River Near Ford Cabin.
Flathead National Forest

During a planning meeting in Columbia Falls Wednesday, people who live near the Flathead River said they’re concerned about climate change, user impacts and nearby railroad activity,

Two federal agencies are tasked with updating management of the Flathead’s three forks under the Wild and Scenic River Act: The U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service. They say that despite the river’s unusually high water quality, threats remain.

Students fill sandbags in Missoula's flooded Orchard Homes area, Monday, May 7, 2018.
Josh Burnham

Cooler, wet weather is expected to start moving into Montana. MTPR's Edward O’Brien has more on how this could factor into the state’s unfolding flood crisis.

Rafters on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River.
Glacier National Park (PD)

The Flathead National Forest and Glacier National Park are preparing a new comprehensive management plan for the three forks of the Flathead River, and they want the public’s input. That’s according to an announcement today from the U.S. Forest Service.

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