MTPR

Grand Canyon National Park

U.S. Considers Higher Entry Fees At 17 Popular National Parks

Oct 24, 2017
The National Park Service is floating a steep increase in entrance fees at 17 of its most popular parks, mostly in the West, to address a backlog of maintenance and infrastructure projects.
Flickr user Lance Mountain (CC-BY-NC-ND)

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The National Park Service is floating a steep increase in entrance fees at 17 of its most popular parks, mostly in the West, to address a backlog of maintenance and infrastructure projects.

Visitors to the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Yellowstone, Zion and other national parks would be charged $70 per vehicle, up from the current fee of $30 for a weekly pass. At others, the hike is nearly triple, from $25 to $70.

A 30-day public comment period opened Tuesday.

Visitor Misbehavior Abounds As National Park Service Turns 100

Aug 29, 2016
In the spring of 2016 a Canadian tourist in Yellowtone put a bison calf in his SUV hoping to save it. Less spectacular but equally dangerous and rule-breaking behavior at the parks is on the rise, according to law enforcement officials.
Courtesy

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Tourist John Gleason crept through the grass, four small children close behind, inching toward a bull elk with antlers like small trees at the edge of a meadow in Yellowstone National Park.

"They're going to give me a heart attack," said Gleason's mother-in-law, Barbara Henry, as the group came within about a dozen yards of the massive animal.

"Moment: Grand Canyon"

May 18, 2015
Grand Canyon National Park Service

We have just arrived.
We are standing on the south rim
looking down, feeling our bodies slip

and fall away from us past the cliff face
into that deep space below. We feel light
and small now, our equilibrium shaken, as we watch

the raven riding thermals, its sleek black feathers
shining in the sun as it glides just above the rim
then drops down again. Out across the chasm

Shiva's Temple rises above a moat
of mist and seems to float. Someone aims
a camera, someone puts his hand in his pocket

Michael Troutman/www.dmtimaging.com

7/1/14 & 7/2/14: This week on "Reflections West:" Four Corners area fiction writer, Erica Olsen, notes the distracting nature of Grand Canyon visitors' obsessions with cameras and technology. From his book, The Colorado, Frank Waters points out that "for all our technological achievements, our very lives tremble upon the delicate scales of nature."