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Healthcare

Healthcare news from Montana Public Radio.

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Kristin Page-Nei, one of the authors of I-185, speaks in support of the initiative in Helena, April 19, 2018. The ballot initiative proposes increasing tobacco taxes to raise money for health care programs, including Medicaid expansion.
Corin-Cates Carney

Montana’s Medicaid expansion program, which provides more than 93,000 people in the state health coverage, expires in just over a year. Campaigns are now underway to stop that from happening and to lobby support for the health care program.

Morphine pills.
Eric Norris (CC-BY-2)

The Trump administration this week released almost $500 million to combat the nation’s opioid crisis. 

Montana’s share of that federal funding from Health and Human Services is $2 million, the same amount it received last year.

Governor Steve Bullock launched a statewide tour today to, in his words, "highlight the health and economic benefits of Medicaid" in Montana.

At Missoula’s Providence Hospital, Bullock cited a University of Montana economic analysis released last week that says the Medicaid expansion Montana launched in 2015 will pay for itself. It found that expansion offsets other state agency costs, and yields economic benefits that exceed state spending on Medicaid expansion.

Democratic candidates are divided on health care; a new no-frills campaign ad; some candidates soften their stance on gun control; money can buy political happiness; and remembering former Montana Senator and U.S. Rep. "Doc" Melcher. Learn more on this episode of "Campaign Beat," with Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson and Rob Saldin.

From left, Democratic U.S. House candidates Jared Pettinato, John Meyer, Kathleen Williams, Grant Kier, Blair Koch (sitting in for Lynda Moss), John Heenan and Libertarian candidate Elinor Swanson answered questions in Seeley Lake on April 11.
Nicky Ouellet

Nearly 100 people showed up at the Seeley Lake Community Center Wednesday night to meet the candidates vying to challenge Republican Greg Gianforte for Montana’s lone U.S. House seat.

The six Democrats and one Libertarian chatted with potential voters over pizza before settling in for a rapid fire forum.

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