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Healthcare

Healthcare news from Montana Public Radio.

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Governor Steve Bullock launched a statewide tour today to, in his words, "highlight the health and economic benefits of Medicaid" in Montana.

At Missoula’s Providence Hospital, Bullock cited a University of Montana economic analysis released last week that says the Medicaid expansion Montana launched in 2015 will pay for itself. It found that expansion offsets other state agency costs, and yields economic benefits that exceed state spending on Medicaid expansion.

Democratic candidates are divided on health care; a new no-frills campaign ad; some candidates soften their stance on gun control; money can buy political happiness; and remembering former Montana Senator and U.S. Rep. "Doc" Melcher. Learn more on this episode of "Campaign Beat," with Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson and Rob Saldin.

From left, Democratic U.S. House candidates Jared Pettinato, John Meyer, Kathleen Williams, Grant Kier, Blair Koch (sitting in for Lynda Moss), John Heenan and Libertarian candidate Elinor Swanson answered questions in Seeley Lake on April 11.
Nicky Ouellet

Nearly 100 people showed up at the Seeley Lake Community Center Wednesday night to meet the candidates vying to challenge Republican Greg Gianforte for Montana’s lone U.S. House seat.

The six Democrats and one Libertarian chatted with potential voters over pizza before settling in for a rapid fire forum.

Medicaid expansion in Montana is expected to cost the state more than $58 million annually in a couple of years. But, a new economic analysis says the healthcare program in on track to pay for itself by then through savings in other parts of the state budget and increased economic activity.

Gov. Bullock signs the Medicaid expansion plan into law, April 29, 2015 at the state Capitol. The bill's sponsor Sen. Ed Buttrey, and supporter Stephanie Wallace look on.
Steve Jess

Governor Steve Bullock is praising a new report outlining the economic benefits of Medicaid expansion in Montana. The program expanding health insurance coverage for people with low incomes is set to expire next year unless it’s reauthorized by state lawmakers.

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