MTPR

historical nonfiction

Between 1864 and 1889, the buffalo were exterminated, the Indian wars ended, tribal nations were confined to reservations, cattle and sheep by the tens of thousands grazed the open range, Butte exploded into a city with electricity and millionaires, and multiple railroads connected Montana to the world. “Montana 1889” tells the many stories of this overwhelming transformation by entering into the lives, emotions, and decisions of Indians, miners, cowboys, women, and entrepreneurs who were cooperating and competing in the new state.

We are excited to offer an exclusive extended interview with Ken Egan about his book Montana 1889 via our podcast and web streaming.  

The Irish-American story, with all its twists and triumphs, is told through the improbable life of one man in Seattle author Timothy Egan's book The Immortal Irishman:  The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero .

A dashing young orator during the Great Famine of the 1840s, in which a million of his Irish countrymen died, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony. He escaped and six months later was heralded in the streets of New York — the revolutionary hero, back from the dead, at the dawn of the great Irish immigration to America.

From the Wind River Range to the Canadian border, the northern Rocky Mountain West is an outsized land of stunning dimensions and emotive power. In Visions of the Big Sky, Dan Flores revisits the Northern Rockies artistic tradition to explore its diversity and richness. In his essays about the artists, photographers, and thematic historical imagery of the region, he blends art and cultural history with personal reflection to assess the formation of the region’s character.

Men Behaving Badly In Montana

Dec 3, 2014

Ken Egan Jr. talks about the reasons behind Montana's designation as a U.S. territory, which included very bad behavior by many of the men who were desperate to grab a bit of the region's resources for themselves. He also tells stories about some of the key characters of the time and reads from his new book, MONTANA 1864: Indians, Emigrants, and God in the Territorial Year.

About the book:

MONTANA 1864

Dec 1, 2014

One hundred and fifty years ago, the land that would become the state of Montana was mostly wild and untrammeled, as it had been for millennia. But then, everything changed. And Ken Egan Jr. wanted to know why. He looked for a book to explain the events of 1864. But didn’t find one. So he wrote his own, which turned out to be a humbling process for this Montana-born scholar.

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