historical nonfiction

From the Wind River Range to the Canadian border, the northern Rocky Mountain West is an outsized land of stunning dimensions and emotive power. In Visions of the Big Sky, Dan Flores revisits the Northern Rockies artistic tradition to explore its diversity and richness. In his essays about the artists, photographers, and thematic historical imagery of the region, he blends art and cultural history with personal reflection to assess the formation of the region’s character.

Ken Egan Jr. talks about the reasons behind Montana's designation as a U.S. territory, which included very bad behavior by many of the men who were desperate to grab a bit of the region's resources for themselves. He also tells stories about some of the key characters of the time and reads from his new book, MONTANA 1864: Indians, Emigrants, and God in the Territorial Year.

About the book:

MONTANA 1864

Dec 1, 2014

One hundred and fifty years ago, the land that would become the state of Montana was mostly wild and untrammeled, as it had been for millennia. But then, everything changed. And Ken Egan Jr. wanted to know why. He looked for a book to explain the events of 1864. But didn’t find one. So he wrote his own, which turned out to be a humbling process for this Montana-born scholar.

Andrew R. Graybill talks about and reads from The Red and The White: A Family Saga of the American West, in which he writes about Malcolm Clarke and the Blackfoot Nation of Montana.

About the book: