MTPR

hunting

Grizzly bear at Swan Lake Flats in Yellowstone National Park.
Jim Peaco (PD)

Most grizzly bears living near Yellowstone National Park are bedding down for winter, but the debate over the Trump administration removing Yellowstone grizzlies from the threatened species list earlier this year is not. De-listing is being challenged in court, and for now, the grizzlies are being managed by the states. 

Wyoming is considering a potential grizzly bear hunt, and its wildlife management agency is holding a series of meetings to get public input on that. As Yellowstone Public Radio’s Nate Hegyi found out at a meeting in Jackson, the public is divided.

At a ranch house in rural Montana, Rick White peels the bun off Arby's new venison sandwich.

"It looks like deer," he says. "Venison."

His dog, Finn, stares at the sandwich and whines.

"It's a gray meat," he says. "It doesn't look like a ground patty. It looks more like McDonald's style, but thicker."

Like a lot of people in Montana, White is a lifelong deer hunter. And he's just the kind of person Arby's wants eating their new venison and elk steak sandwiches.

Mule deer.
(PD)

Big game hunting season is now underway, and this year Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is doing more than ever before to look for Chronic Wasting Disease. The agency has a million dollars to spend on disease surveillance and testing over the next five years.

Emily Almberg is a disease ecologist with FWP. She says it’s inevitable that the disease will be discovered in Montana any day now.

Montana Bill Would Make Hunting And Fishing A Constitutional Right
Flickr User Jeff Noble (CC-BY-2)

A legislative change in the funding for the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks means game wardens will be required to do more wildlife management work, making them less available for law enforcement needs, the agency said.

Troy Downing posted on his Facebook page that he is, “looking forward to showing and demonstrating these charges are baseless.”
Public Domain

A Republican hopeful campaigning to run for Senate in 2018 is defending himself against misdemeanor charges of purchasing resident hunting and fishing licenses as a nonresident.

Yesterday, Troy Downing posted on his Facebook page that he is, “looking forward to showing and demonstrating these charges are baseless.” Downing also suggested in the post that the charges are politically motivated. 

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