MTPR

hunting

Montana Won't Allow Yellowstone-Area Grizzly Bear Hunts In 2018

Feb 15, 2018
Grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park. (File photo).
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana won't hold a grizzly bear hunt in 2018 after state officials said Thursday they want to avoid complicating lawsuits over the animal's legal status.

Federal officials last year lifted Endangered Species Act protections for about 700 bears in and around Yellowstone National Park, opening the door to potential hunting in the three-state region.

Grizzly bear.
(PD)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana wildlife officials are recommending against holding a grizzly bear hunt in 2018 after the animals lost their federal protections across a three-state region around Yellowstone National Park.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks Director Martha Williams said Thursday the state wants to demonstrate its commitment to the grizzly's long-term recovery.

Cow elk.
PD

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Government biologists say elk numbers in the northern part of Yellowstone National Park are at their highest level in more than a decade.

Results of a two-day winter survey released Wednesday showed more than 7,500 elk in Yellowstone and areas of Montana north of the park. That's up more than 40 percent compared to 2017 and marks the highest population level since 2005.

The search continues for dozens of bison reported missing from two holding pens at Yellowstone National Park. Authorities say the animals escaped when somebody used bolt cutters to open up a fence. Park officials are calling the incident a crime. 

 

Mule deer buck.
(PD)

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks says it has almost reached its quota for mule deer in the state’s first ever special chronic wasting disease hunt in Carbon County. But the number of harvested whitetails lags behind.

Bob Gibson, a spokesman for FWP, says 183 mule deer have been taken. That means the special hunt for mule deer could end as early as Sunday evening if the quota of 200 is reached.

Pages