MTPR

invasive species

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is offering a $100,000 award for new approaches to eradicate invasive quagga and zebra mussels from open water.
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is offering a $100,000 award for new approaches to eradicate invasive quagga and zebra mussels from open water.

The Bureau opened a prize challenge competition last December to generate new ideas to wipe the mollusks out of open water, something that’s never been done before.

That green and brown gunk is a mix of algae, plankton and bits of genetic material that hold the answer to whether Flathead Lake has mussels in it. One sample comes from 9 meters deep, the other from the surface.
Nicky Ouellet

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Thursday announced it detected additional evidence of invasive mussels in one eastern Montana reservoir last summer. The detection raises a few red flags.

FWP found microscopic invasive baby mussels in Tiber and Canyon Ferry Reservoirs for the first time in the fall of 2016. But the state agency and its partners didn’t find any last summer.

State budgets.
(PD)

Montana is starting to feel the impact of budget cuts that lawmakers approved as a way to deal with the state's $227 million deficit. Here's a roundup of some of our reporting on the state budget cuts so far.

Stop aquatic hitchhikers. Be a good steward. Clean. Drain. Dry.
stopaquatichitchhikers.org

Welcome to the fifth and final episode of "SubSurface: Resisting Montana’s Underwater Invaders." Today we’re putting our producer Nicky Ouellet in the hot seat to answer some listener questions about mussels.

Learn more about how you can help stop the spread of aquatic invasive species, on this episode of SubSurface.

FWP has inspected more than 23,000 watercraft as part of its effort to keep the mussels, which can cause millions of dollars of damage to hydropower dams and irrigation systems, out of Montana’s waterways.
Katrin Frye

Agencies responding to the discovery of invasive mussels in two Montana reservoirs east of the continental divide last year are working to better align their prevention programs.

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