MTPR

jazz

Vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, performing at the Berkeley (CA) Jazz Festival in 1982.
Brian McMillen (CC-BY-SA-2)

After Lionel Hampton and Milt Jackson, no one did more for the vibraphone as a voice in jazz than Bobby Hutcherson. Hutcherson pased away August 15 at the age of 75.

From his early recordings with Al Grey and Billy Mitchell, Jackie McLean, and Grant Green, on through the sixties and seventies, Hutcherson made the vibes a solo voice to be reckoned with. He carried the vibes beyond swing and Be-bop into free jazz, Avant Garde, and soul jazz.

Onward and upward: Faun and a Pan Flute
Faun and a Pan Flute

Faun and a Pan Flute is a collectively-led experimental nonet from Atlanta, GA. Their restless soundscapes are both demented and uplifting; restrained yet chaotic; complex, but still accessible.

Though abstract, these avant-warriors provide a create-your-own-ending sort of narrative with their compositions, all based around primal rhythms and controlled chaos.

Tom Brokaw will be a guest on the 100th episode of "You Must Remember This," on MTPR Monday, June 6 at 8:00 p.m.
Courtesy

Journalist Tom Brokaw will be Allen Secher’s guest on the 100th edition of Montana Public Radio’s monthly musical series “You Must Remember This,” which will air at 8:00 p.m. Monday, June 6. MTPR also will air portions of the interview on “Here & Now” at 1:00 p.m. Monday, June 6. You can listen to the interview portion of the show now.

"What I like About Jazz" does a retrospective on the career of George Coleman, in honor of his first album as a leader in many years. George came up in the 1950's, and played and recorded with Lee Morgan, Booker Little, and Max Roach, then replaced Hank Mobley in Miles Davis' band in 1963. Coleman has recorded as a leader and sideman, and was the original saxophone in Eastern Rebellion with Cedar Walton and Billy Higgins.

Hear all these and more on MTPR, including his new album "The Master Speaks," Wednesday, May 25 from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. on your radio, or online.

Duke Ellington
(PD)

Duke Ellington deserves a separate room in any musical hall of fame. His orchestra included countless musicians already listed in that hall. His songs "Mood Indigo", "Sophisticated Lady", "In a Sentimental Mood" and "Take the A Train" and a host of others still remain on any major list.

Tune in for this special Monday, April 4 at 8:00 p.m.

Starting in 1949, Howard Rumsey helped introduce the world to what would eventually be called “West Coast Jazz” at the Lighthouse in Hermosa Beach, California.  During the ensuing several decades the venue would provide a stage for artists like Lee Morgan, Grant Green, Joe Henderson and Rumsey’s own group, The Lighthouse All-Stars. 

The band Snarky Puppy has been described as "a truly different kind of musical animal."  Once Texas’s best-kept musical secret, they’ve become a Grammy-winning jazz, funk world, soul and pop combo, collecting fans like Prince and Pat Metheny along the way. Their most recent recording, a collaboration with Metropol Orkest, a Dutch orchestra, has topped Billboard charts in several categories.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the release of RUBBER SOUL, and because there are so many great covers out there, "What I Like About Jazz" pays tribute to the Beatles this week. From Grant Green to Tony Williams and Count Basie to modernists like David Kikoski and Brad Mehldau, jazz artists as far back as 1964 have covered the Beatles.

We'll pay special tribute to trombone players, including Curtis Fuller, JJ Johnson, Bob Brookmeyer, Frank Rosolino, and Steve Davis. But we'll also hear some great arrangers and some favorite tunes.

Join John Arvish and guest Rob Tapper, Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Montana, this week on What I Like About Jazz. That's Wednesday, November 25, from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. on MTPR; online or on your radio.

Dizzy Gillespie in concert, Deauville, Normandy, France
Roland Godefro (CC-BY-3)

American jazz artists, and indeed the jazz form have had a strong link with with Paris since the early days of jazz. This week on "What I Like About Jazz," we pay tribute to France's love of American jazz, with recordings made there by the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Donald Byrd, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Dexter Gordon. We'll also hear from classic French artists including Michel LeGrand, Barney Wilen, Bobby Jaspar, and Jacques Loussier. Tune in Wednesday, November 18 from 8:00-10:00 p.m. on your radio or online.

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