MTPR

jazz

One For All is the longest running cooperative group in jazz, now starting into their third decade. Founding Horn players Steve Davis, Eric Alexander, Jim Rotondi, and the Rhythm section of David Hazeltine, John Weber and Joe Farnsworth recently released their 16th album, "The Third Decade," and will be a featured act at Newport Jazz Festival on August 4.

Tune in for a close look at the collaborative careers of this group, from solo efforts going back 25 years, to their first album in 1997, to their latest. Wednesday, July 26, from 8-10 p.m., on your radio or online on "What I Like About Jazz."

Tune In For Montana Jazz And Classic Blues On MTPR

Jul 18, 2017

Montana Jazz Artists are the focus on "What I Like About Jazz" this week. Montana has a long history of great jazz players. There is a wide range of artists from players like Jack Walrath, Jim Rotondi, David Morgenroth, and Chuck Florence, to singers Dee Daniels, Eden Atwood, MJ Williams, and Jeni Fleming.

In a career spanning half a century, Bruce Lundvall worked with a wide variety of artists including Miles Davis, Dianne Reeves, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Norah Jones as the president of Blue Note Records. Phil Chess and his brother founded Chess Records, a storied Chicago label that captured great blues musicians like Muddy Waters in their prime and helped establish rock ’n’ roll as a musical genre. He even helped start the careers of Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones.

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Jazz piano great Horace Parlan passed away March 1, at the age of 86. His unique piano style was heard in classic recordings by Charles Mingus, Stanley Turrentine, Thad Jones, and many more Jazz artists from the late 1950's through the '80s. Join us on "What I Like About Jazz" on  March 15 for a tribute to Horace Parlan.

Emily Remler at Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, California.
Brianmcmillen (CC BY-SA 3.0)

We all know of many great women in jazz, but usually what comes to mind are the singers- Ella, Billie, Sarah, Dinah, we could list dozens of great ones. Most people can name at least a couple of piano players, too; Marian McPartland and Mary Lou Williams quickly come to mind.

But what about all the other instruments associated with jazz?

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