jazz

Duke Ellington
(PD)

Duke Ellington deserves a separate room in any musical hall of fame. His orchestra included countless musicians already listed in that hall. His songs "Mood Indigo", "Sophisticated Lady", "In a Sentimental Mood" and "Take the A Train" and a host of others still remain on any major list.

Tune in for this special Monday, April 4 at 8:00 p.m.

Starting in 1949, Howard Rumsey helped introduce the world to what would eventually be called “West Coast Jazz” at the Lighthouse in Hermosa Beach, California.  During the ensuing several decades the venue would provide a stage for artists like Lee Morgan, Grant Green, Joe Henderson and Rumsey’s own group, The Lighthouse All-Stars. 

The band Snarky Puppy has been described as "a truly different kind of musical animal."  Once Texas’s best-kept musical secret, they’ve become a Grammy-winning jazz, funk world, soul and pop combo, collecting fans like Prince and Pat Metheny along the way. Their most recent recording, a collaboration with Metropol Orkest, a Dutch orchestra, has topped Billboard charts in several categories.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the release of RUBBER SOUL, and because there are so many great covers out there, "What I Like About Jazz" pays tribute to the Beatles this week. From Grant Green to Tony Williams and Count Basie to modernists like David Kikoski and Brad Mehldau, jazz artists as far back as 1964 have covered the Beatles.

We'll pay special tribute to trombone players, including Curtis Fuller, JJ Johnson, Bob Brookmeyer, Frank Rosolino, and Steve Davis. But we'll also hear some great arrangers and some favorite tunes.

Join John Arvish and guest Rob Tapper, Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Montana, this week on What I Like About Jazz. That's Wednesday, November 25, from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. on MTPR; online or on your radio.

Dizzy Gillespie in concert, Deauville, Normandy, France
Roland Godefro (CC-BY-3)

American jazz artists, and indeed the jazz form have had a strong link with with Paris since the early days of jazz. This week on "What I Like About Jazz," we pay tribute to France's love of American jazz, with recordings made there by the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Donald Byrd, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Dexter Gordon. We'll also hear from classic French artists including Michel LeGrand, Barney Wilen, Bobby Jaspar, and Jacques Loussier. Tune in Wednesday, November 18 from 8:00-10:00 p.m. on your radio or online.

Poetry’s been around a long time. Jazz, on the other hand, is a relatively recent American original. So why would jazz composer Wayne Horvitz write music in honor of a poet? Specifically, about Richard Hugo, perhaps Montana’s most renowned practitioner of the art? Wayne Horvitz explains on this episode of "Home Ground Radio,” listen now.

Nat & Cannonball Adderly are amond the jazz musicians featured on a Veterans Day special "What I Like About Jazz" on MTPR.
Dave Brinkman (CC-BY-SA-3)

This week on "What I Like About Jazz", we pay tribute to jazz musicians who served in the armed forces. Four branches of the service will be represented.

We'll hear from everyone from Jack Sheldon (Air Force) to Nat and Cannonball Adderley (Army) to John Coltrane (Navy) and Oliver Nelson (Marines). Other Veterans include Wynton Kelly, Junior Mance, Clark Terry, Aaron Bell, Jamil Nasser and many, many more.

This week on What I Like About Jazz, we pay tribute to the songs of Cal Massey, a brilliant composer, arranger and little-known trumpet player. We'll hear from Lee Morgan, John Coltrane, Herbie Mann, Freddie Hubbard, Houston Person, McCoy Tyner, Archie Shepp, and more.

Cheesecake Studio

Since his debut at age thirteen with the Cotton Club All-Star Band of Harlem, guitarist and singer "King" Solomon Hicks has been winning over audiences at music festivals, clubs, churches, and rock arenas around the world with his virtuosic mix of blues, jazz, funk, gospel, classical, R & B, Afro-Cuban and classic rock.

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