MTPR

jazz

Host John Arvish continues to explore the six-decades-long career of engineer Rudy Van Gelder Wednesday on "What I Like About Jazz," starting at 8:00 p.m.

After moving into his own studio at Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Van Gelder continued his long relationship with Blue Note Records, as the primary engineer on most of their hundreds of sessions between 1953 and 1967.

He also developed a relationship with the newly-formed Impulse Records. Among his many sessions there, Van Gelder recorded nearly all of John Coltrane's records up until his death. He also did pivotal sessions with J.J. Johnson, Yusef Lateef, McCoy Tyner and numerous others.

Vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, performing at the Berkeley (CA) Jazz Festival in 1982.
Brian McMillen (CC-BY-SA-2)

After Lionel Hampton and Milt Jackson, no one did more for the vibraphone as a voice in jazz than Bobby Hutcherson. Hutcherson pased away August 15 at the age of 75.

From his early recordings with Al Grey and Billy Mitchell, Jackie McLean, and Grant Green, on through the sixties and seventies, Hutcherson made the vibes a solo voice to be reckoned with. He carried the vibes beyond swing and Be-bop into free jazz, Avant Garde, and soul jazz.

Onward and upward: Faun and a Pan Flute
Faun and a Pan Flute

Faun and a Pan Flute is a collectively-led experimental nonet from Atlanta, GA. Their restless soundscapes are both demented and uplifting; restrained yet chaotic; complex, but still accessible.

Though abstract, these avant-warriors provide a create-your-own-ending sort of narrative with their compositions, all based around primal rhythms and controlled chaos.

Tom Brokaw was Allen Secher's guest on the 100th episode of "You Must Remember This." Listen to an encore broadcast on MTPR Monday, June 5, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
Courtesy

Journalist Tom Brokaw was Allen Secher’s guest on the 100th edition of Montana Public Radio’s monthly musical program, “You Must Remember This."     Brokaw’s best-seller, “The Greatest Generation,” serves as a frame for this hour-long exploration of the hardships and sentiments of a generation, all of it reflected in the big-band, jazz and popular music of the 1930s and 1940s.

"What I like About Jazz" does a retrospective on the career of George Coleman, in honor of his first album as a leader in many years. George came up in the 1950's, and played and recorded with Lee Morgan, Booker Little, and Max Roach, then replaced Hank Mobley in Miles Davis' band in 1963. Coleman has recorded as a leader and sideman, and was the original saxophone in Eastern Rebellion with Cedar Walton and Billy Higgins.

Hear all these and more on MTPR, including his new album "The Master Speaks," Wednesday, May 25 from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. on your radio, or online.

Pages