MTPR

Jon Tester

The website Enhancing Montana's Wildlife and Habitat uncovered citations against Troy Downing
http://www.emwh.org

One of the Republicans campaigning for Montana’s Senate seat that’s up in 2018 is facing multiple charges for trying to purchase resident hunting and fishing licenses as a nonresident.

Troy Downing of Big Sky has pleaded not guilty to seven misdemeanor citations.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokeswoman Andrea Jones confirmed the citations, which were first reported by Bozeman blogger Kathryn QannaYahu.

MTPR News Director Eric Whitney: On Monday we took a look at the race for Montana's senate seat that's up in 2018. On Tuesday David Parker is back to talk about the 2018 House race. Parker is a political science professor at Montana State University. David Parker, thanks for joining us on Montana Public Radio.

PublicDomainPictures.net

MTPR News Director Eric Whitney: By my count there are at least five formally declared candidates, and then there's Billings Judge Russel Fagg, who hasn't officially declared, but he certainly looks like a candidate. Is Fagg really just exploring a Senate run, or is he just saying that?

MSU Political Science Professor David Parker joins us with a look at the 2018 Senate race.

West Fork firefighter serving as a lookout for Hotshot crews working below on the Nelson Creek fire.
Inciweb

On the Senate floor Wednesday, both of Montana's senators gave 10-minute speeches about wildfires in Montana.

"Climate change is real, and we can't continue to sit on the sidelines," Democratic Senator Jon Tester said.

Republican Senator Steve Daines focused on, "The mis-management of our federal forests, and these radical environmentalists."

Both Daines and Tester talked about Montana's fires in the context of the nation's attention being primarily on hurricanes at the moment.

Mandy Mohler started Field Guide Designs after spending a week in the Bob Marshall photographing items she found in the Spruce Park Cabin. She says her business wouldn't be possible if it weren't for Montana's public lands.
Nicky Ouellet

For the past two decades, Montanans have been making more money, creating more jobs and  increasing investment and retirement income in the state. What’s the cause for all this growth? Ray Rasker of Headwaters Economics Research says it has to do with the best asset in the last best state: public lands.

"Rural counties around the West that have a lot of federal land have faster growth in population, faster growth in employment, and faster growth in personal income," Rasker says.

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