MTPR

Karl Rosston

Ida Follette(r) and her husband Darrell Follette speaking about the suicide of their daughter Chelle Rose Follette, aged 13, at their home. Taken Feb. 2011, Poplar, MT on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation.
Mike Albans

Montana’s suicide rate is nearly double the national average. In the last two years, more than 550 Montanans killed themselves. Twenty-seven of them were adolescents.

Western Montana’s major suicide prevention collaborative re-launched under a new name today.
File Photo (PD)

Livingston is still trying to come to grips with a cluster of suicides that claimed four lives almost a month ago. Experts there say different people are dealing with the crisis in different ways.

Preventing Suicide Is Everybody’s Business

Aug 20, 2014

Robin Williams’ suicide has rocked the nation.  How could someone with such talent, so universally beloved, not see life as worth living? 

Closer to home, too many of us in western Montana have lost family, friends and colleagues to suicide.  Their deaths leave a hole in our hearts and in the fabric of our community.  As we grieve the loss of a loved one to suicide, we agonize over whether we missed warning signs, and ask ourselves what more we could have done. 

MT DPHHS

As we've reported this week, the state's recently-appointed Suicide Review Team has pledged to review every suicide that occurs in Montana this year to try to determine the reason and recommend ways to reduce the state's suicide rate, which is nearly twice the national average.
 
     The team, appointed in November by Gov. Steve Bullock, includes a pastor, psychologist, psychiatrist, sheriff, a schools official and a social worker along with Karl Rosston, the state's suicide prevention coordinator for the past six years.