MTPR

Lincoln Montana

A road closed sign in a flooded Missoula neighborhood, May 12, 2018.
Inciweb

Flooding continues to be a concern on rivers and streams across western and central Montana. In Missoula, evacuation orders are still in place for 65 homes, with warnings posted for an additional 2,200 more. But there’s at least a glimmer of good news for the Clark Fork River above Missoula.

Volunteers fill sandbags at Fort Missoula, May 15, 2018 in Missoula, MT.
Olivia Sears

Flooding on some western Montana rivers slowed early this week, but warming temperatures mean more flooding is on the way.

The Clark Fork River near the University of Montana Campus, April 30, 2018. The river has flooded parts of Missoula further west.
Josh Burnham

The weekend’s cold front dropped a lot of rain over western Montana and sent the Clark Fork into a minor flood stage by mid-morning Sunday.

According to Missoula National Weather Service meteorologist Bob Nester says the river was expected to reach moderate flood stage by Tuesday evening.

USGS map showing the areas shaken by Thursday's earthquake.
USGS

From bar stools to bed frames, hundreds of Montanans felt the magnitude 5.8 earthquake early Thursday morning that originated a few miles southeast of Lincoln.

Listen to the audio to hear what the quake’s seismograph reading sounds like. Thanks to French geologist Anthony Lomax for tweeting this audio file, produced by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology.

USGS Community Intensity Map shows where the earthquake was felt.
USGS

Updated 5:20 a.m. 07/06/17:

Some Montanans were shaken awake at about 12:30 am by an earthquake with an epicenter about six miles south-east of Lincoln.

Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with the National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado said, "the magnitude on the quake was a magnitude 5.8, and it occurred at a depth of about 13 kilometers, which is a little over 6 miles."

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