MTPR

memoir

From a lineage of secondhand family cars of the late ’60s, to the Honda that carried her from Montana to Texas as her new marriage disintegrated, to the ’70s Ford she drove away from her brother’s house after he took his life (leaving Melissa the truck, a dog, and a few mix tapes), to the VW van she now uses to take her kids camping, she knows these cars better than she knows some of the people closest to her. Driven away from grief, and toward hope, Melissa reckons with what it means to lose a beloved sibling.

Driven will be released July 24th. Pre-order it here or from the retailer of your choice.

"I met Scorchy in the summer of 1965 when I was 12 years old.  I was the new kid in a small town in south central Montana.  I was also pretty much a wimp and socially awkward.  Try as I might to fit in with the other boys, I lacked two of the most important attributes necessary for success in rural life, the first being that I wasn’t-as I was constantly reminded by the locals-“from around here,” and second, I wasn’t any good at sports.  Up to that time I had lived a very sheltered life as the son of a naval officer.  While that led to seeing a lot of the world in a few short years, it hadn’t helped me develop much in the way of social skills or athletic prowess.  Like Scorchy later said to me, “You’ve lived around, but you haven’t lived.” -- Cyrus Lee

What if labor does not end with pregnancy but continues into a mother’s postpartum life? How can the fiercest love for your child and the deepest wells of grief coexist in the same moment? How has society neglected honest conversation around the significant physical changes new mothers experience? Could real healing occur if generations of women were fluent in the language of their bodies? 

The dating world can be a harsh, exhausting, and intimidating place, but it can also be the doorway to a bright and beautiful future with someone you connect with. The only problem is, in our modern, fast-paced society, you never know which side of that coin you’re going to get.

Tommy Donovan

"Tommy Donovan, the 'bastard son of an immigrant Irishman" writes powerfully about his inovlement with gangs, sex, heroin addiction, and his inspiring struggle to heal the wounds of a painful childhood. It's an engrossing journey from youth to manhood, from West Side Story to Bob Dylan." -- Eve Pell, Award-winning investigative reporter

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