MTPR

Montana Department of Environmental Quality

The Cabinet Mountains as seen from Highway 56 near Noxon, MT.
U.S. Forest Service Northern Region (PD)

Montana regulators announced today that an Idaho mining company hoping to develop two mines in northwest Montana has violated state law; an allegation the company denies.

Dioxin contaminated soil at the Montana Pole Plant in Butte, Montana.
Montana DEQ

As the state Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) gets closer to finishing the clean-up of dioxin-contaminated soil at Butte’s smallest Superfund site, the Montana Pole Plant, some members of the community are still concerned about the human health risk.

In response, a risk assessment expert visited Butte to break down options for protecting human health with a contaminant that just won’t break down.

A map from the West Glacier RV and Cabin  Village draft environmental assessment showing proposed water and sewer improvements for the project.
Montana DEQ

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this story misstated the total number of RV spaces West Glacier RV and Cabin Village plans to develop. The error has been corrected in this copy.

The public has been given longer to comment on part of a big, new RV park outside Glacier National Park that was approved by Flathead County last year.

The state department of Environmental Quality is now considering permits for water, wastewater, storm runoff, and solid waste management from Glacier Park, Inc. The company plans to develop a 102-space RV park with 25 rental cabins.

Algae growth is increasing on Montana’s famed Smith River and scientists don’t know why. So, they’re turning to the public for help.

Excessive algae can deplete oxygen and alter water pH levels, harming fish and other aquatic life in the process. Algae blooms are also a nuisance to humans who encounter them on rivers and lakes.

Big Timber Locals Say DEQ Water Worries Overblown

Nov 27, 2017
McLeod St. in Big Timber, MT.
Matt Blois

Every morning at 6 a.m. a group of men gather at the Frosty Freeze in Big Timber to drink coffee and share gossip. It's a diner, decorated with 1950s Coca Cola posters and old records. A sign hanging near the cash register reads, "Cows may come and cows may go, but the bull in this place goes on forever."

Five men sit at a table near the door, and a waitress provides a continuous stream of hot coffee. She places a plastic pitcher with ice cold tap water in the center of the table. Lately, this coffee group has talked a lot about water.

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