Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks

A fish-killing disease prompted the closure of 180 miles of the Yellowstone River and hundreds of miles of tributaries. Some portions of the river are now open to some recreation.
Courtesy Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

A section of the Yellowstone River from Yellowstone National Park downstream to Laurel was closed starting August 19 by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks after thousands of dead mountain whitefish began appearing on the river’s banks.

State Wildlife officials today re-opened portions of the Yellowstone River and most of its tributaries, but it kept a popular stretch of the waterway closed to all recreational activity because of a parasite that’s killed thousands of fish.

The closure has been in place since August 19.

Dead mountain whitefish in the Yellowstone River on August 24, 2016. Officials estimated that tens of thousands of fish have been killed by a rare parasite.
Eric Whitney

About 400 people came to the public meeting in Livingston last night about the fish kill that’s caused the closure of a 180-mile section of the Yellowstone River and hundreds of miles of its tributaries, from the boundary of Yellowstone National Park downstream to Laurel.

About 400 people came to a hall at the Park County Fairgrounds in Livingston to learn more about the Yellowstone River fish kill
Eric Whitney

About 400 people turned out at the Park County Fairgrounds in Livingston last night to get the latest on the Yellowstone River fish kill from Montana’s Fish, Wildlife and Parks department. 

FWP staff told the crowd that there’s still a lot they don’t know about how widespread the parasite is that’s killing mostly mountain whitefish in the Yellowstone River and its tributaries, but they’re working hard and expect to know more soon.

A fish-killing disease prompted the closure of 180 miles of the Yellowstone River and hundreds of miles of tributaries. Some portions of the river are now open to some recreation.
Courtesy Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

In Livingston tonight, state wildlife officials are updating the public on the fish killing disease that's prompted them to close 180 miles of the Yellowstone River, and hundreds of miles of tributaries.

Trout Unlimited's Patrick Byorth will be at the meeting. Sitting beside a tributary of the Yellowstone in the Paradise Valley today, he says people are going to have a lot of questions.

The recent fish kill in the Yellowstone River is painting a picture of Montana in national headlines that’s a little different than what the state’s office of tourism advertises in promotional videos.
(PD)

The recent fish kill in the Yellowstone River is painting a picture of Montana in national headlines that’s a little different than what the state’s office of tourism advertises in this promotional video.

"Where the mountains thrust skyward and giant pyramids of granite and the rivers run as free and clear as your spirit. A place where you can hear the sound of silence."

After thousands of fish deaths forced an unprecedented closure of 180 miles of the Yellowstone River last week, an official with Montana's Office of Tourism says the state’s branding as a place of pristine landscape is still strong.

The Yellowstone River from Livingston, MT.
J. Stephen Conn (CC-BY-NC-2)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana wildlife officials are conducting tests on fish from additional areas to see if they are infected with a disease blamed in a massive fish kill in the Yellowstone River.

State officials closed a 183-mile stretch of the Yellowstone to all recreational activities on Friday. The unprecedented move came after thousands of fish were killed by a disease spread by a microscopic parasite.

ontana Fish, Wildlife and Parks closed about 180 miles of the Yellowstone River downstream from Yellowstone National Park without a timeline for reopening. The closure could last months.
Wormwould (CC-BY-NC-2)

A microscopic parasite killing tens of thousands of fish forced state wildlife officials to close a portion of the Yellowstone River Friday morning.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks closed about 180 miles of the Yellowstone River downstream from Yellowstone National Park without a timeline for reopening. The closure could last months.

Fishing the Yellowstone River
Flickr user: Mirrur Image (CC-BY-NC)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks this morning closed an approximately 180-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River, and nearby tributaries, due to what it’s calling an “unprecedented” fish kill.

The agency estimates that tens of thousands of fish have died this week from a parasite that causes kidney disease. Most of those are mountain whitefish, but there have been reports of dead rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout.

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