MTPR

Montana Historical Society

Montana Historical Society Press

Step out of a world governed by clocks and calendars and into the world of the Kootenai and Blackfeet peoples, whose traditional territories included the area that is now Glacier National Park.

"Herd Bull," a bronze bison skull sculpture by artist Benji Daniels on display in front of the Montana Historical Society in Helena, MT.
Eric Whitney

Montana's Historical Society has been asking state lawmakers for help to build a new building for years. In the last legislative session it narrowly missed getting the okay to issue bonds for construction. Now, a Republican lawmaker is proposing it sell off parts of its collection to pay for a new museum.

As state lawmakers debate larger budget and infrastructure bills, Billings Representative Dennis Lenz is proposing letting the Historical Society sell art and other objects to generate up to $50 million for construction:

From Ruth Garfield, a female sheriff in 1920, to Elouise Cobell, a Blackfeet banker in the 21st Century, women have significantly shaped the state and communities across Montana. Beyond Schoolmarms and Madams celebrates the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote in Montana, six years before the 19th Amendment. Two of the authors, Annie Hanshew and Laura Ferguson, discuss how the Montana Historical Society selected the collection of women's stories.

Governor's Race Expected To Be The Most Expensive In Montana History

Feb 2, 2016
U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte at January 2016 campaign rally in Helena during his run for governor.
Corin Cates-Carney

Montana's copper barons bought and sold public office like any commodity a century ago, and that legacy looms large in what could become the most expensive governor's race in state history.

People Before The Park

Aug 25, 2015
Blackfeet parade around camp before construction of the Okan lodge, 1908
Walter McClintock, photographer / Yale Collection of Western Americana

Most Montanans have been to Glacier National Park, although few of us know about what went on in that landscape before 1910, the year the Park was created. But now, thanks to a new book published by the Montana Historical Society Press, we have stories about the people who lived there.

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