MTPR

Montana Office of Public Instruction

C.R. Anderson Middle School in Helena.
Dan Boyce

There’s a potential problem with how Montana determines which schools will get special assistance under the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind law. It’s with how schools handle basic student attendance records.

Leaders of Montana’s K-12 public schools system will update state lawmakers Thursday morning about progress on rolling out the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind Act following cuts to education funding last year.

The Office of Public Instruction plans to brief lawmakers on the schools identified this spring as the lowest performing five percent in the state.

Grizzly statue and Main Hall on the University of Montana campus in Missoula.
Josh Burnham

The University of Montana announced today it has received a $1 million donation that the school says will jumpstart its burgeoning health education program.

UM launched its Health and Medicine initiative - called UMHM - in 2016. The program is designed to attract faculty, staff and students to work and study in the health professions.

Depressed teen.
File Photo (PD)

During the last 12 months, almost 10 percent of Montana high school students attempted suicide one or more times. That’s according to a biannual youth risk behavior survey.

State lawmakers this year responded by requiring Montana’s 409 public school districts to draw up suicide prevention and response plans. A committee that met for the first time Wednesday will – as now mandated by law – develop a policy to ensure those districts follow through.

Corin Cates-Carney / Montana Public Radio

Montana’s Office of Public Instruction is unsure if its new draft plan to raise student achievement will comply with federal law.

State education leaders are required to submit a plan to the U.S. Department of Education in September, as part of the 2015 Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, which is the federal replacement for No Child Left Behind. 

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