Montana Tech

Greg Gianforte speaking to the Conrad, Montana Chamber of Commerce
Eric Whitney

Not everybody's summer road trip around Montana generates headlines at every stop, but Greg Gianforte's does, and Gianforte is not just anybody. He's been meeting with local chambers of commerce, like a group of about 10 people at the Sport Club restaurant in Shelby recently.

Montana University System Requests $53 Million In Bonds For Infrastructure

Jan 27, 2015

The Montana University System is asking lawmakers for permission to issue just over $53 million in bonds.

The money would be used to renovate existing buildings to protect the life and safety of students, faculty and staff;  bring the buildings up to code; and for improvements to classrooms and laboratories.

Among the projects: the library building at Montana State Billings. It has the largest lecture classrooms on campus, but it doesn’t comply with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act.

UM's Vice President for Integrated Communications, Peggy Kuhr, says 13,044 students are attending UM this fall semester, a 6 and one half percent drop from last fall.
Josh Burnham

Another enrollment drop at the University of Montana.

A total of 13,952 students enrolled at UM this fall semester. That's 573 fewer than a year ago.

This time last year, UM recorded over 400 fewer students than the prior year.

UM spokeswoman, Peggy Kuhr, says this semester's enrollment drop was not a surprise:

Backlash is growing at Montana Tech in Butte over the choice of the school’s commencement speakers this Spring.

Opponents say Right Now Technologies founders Greg and Susan Gianforte promote extreme religious viewpoints and discriminate against homosexuals. A small group of students and faculty are considering a boycott of the ceremony in mid-May.

Tech is standing by the choice, citing the Gianfortes’ business success and emphasis on getting young people involved with computer science.

When your lab class is 100 feet underground

Oct 8, 2013
Dan Boyce

Montana Tech mining engineering junior Krystal Martin and the eight other students in her lab class were taking turns using a heavy, pneumatic, jack-leg drill to bore six foot holes into a solid rock wall last Friday. It’s definitely louder than the average college lab course, and rather than crisp, white lab coats, students wear mud-soaked work boots, dust streaked faces and hard hats.

About 22,000 men worked the underground mines of Butte at the city’s peak, hauling 20,000 tons of ore back to the surface every day.

But, that was almost 100 years ago.

Montana Tech

Montana Tech is spearheading a project that organizers say will improve the quantity and diversity of native plants on the Butte Hill.