MTPR

Music

Music, artist interviews, and upcoming performances around western Montana.

Join Doc Sandoz & Joan Richarde from 10:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. Friday, Feb. 17 for some psychedelic music medicine on Montana Public Radio.
Brook Trout

The Psychedelic Circus skates its way to the airwaves this Friday, Feb. 17 with an assortment of musical remedies for cabin fever, winter malaise, or whatever may be blocking your way to February bliss!  Join Doc Sandoz & Joan Richarde from 10:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. for some psychedelic music medicine on Montana Public Radio. Tune in on your radio or online.

After a decade of making music together, Paper Bird shifted their lineup, welcoming Carleigh Aikins, who joined Sarah Anderson and Genevieve Patterson as one of band's lead singers. In late 2016, the Denver band released their first recording of its songs, which often remind listeners of territory between Fleet Foxes and Fleetwood Mac. The album benefited from the production expertise of Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, John Oates.

Zach Cooper, Margaret Nichols Baldridge and Christopher Hahn perform trios for violin, horn and piano by Mozart and Brahms, live on Montana Public Radio.
Josh Burnham

Zach Cooper, Margaret Nichols Baldridge and Christopher Hahn perform trios for violin, horn and piano by Mozart and Brahms, live on Montana Public Radio.

Bruce Anfinson, "Montana's Musical Ambassador."
Courtesy bruceanfinson.com

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle calls Bruce Anfinson "Montana's Musical Ambassador." Bruce's ballads and tales of ranching life, draft horses and wildfires reflect his native Montana roots. He's the guest on this episode of "Musican's Spotlight."

MTPR Program Director Michael Marsolek recently hosted The Folk Show on MTPR. He talked with Sierra Hull about her pending trip to Montana, and the first time they met. She was Just 15 years old when MTPR broadcast her set from the first year of the National Folk Festival in Butte in 2008. Listen in to their conversation now.

Emily Remler at Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, California.
Brianmcmillen (CC BY-SA 3.0)

We all know of many great women in jazz, but usually what comes to mind are the singers- Ella, Billie, Sarah, Dinah, we could list dozens of great ones. Most people can name at least a couple of piano players, too; Marian McPartland and Mary Lou Williams quickly come to mind.

But what about all the other instruments associated with jazz?

For more than a decade and a half, the members of Greensky Bluegrass have created their own version of bluegrass music, mixing the acoustic stomp of a stringband with the rule-breaking spirit of rock & roll. They redefine that sound once again with their sixth album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted.

Multiple Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter returns to Musicians’ Spotlight for a conversation with John Floridis from her Virginia home, highlighting her most recent recording, the critically-acclaimed album, "The Things That We Are Made Of."

Get hep to the scene with Joan and the good doctor as they blitz the airwaves with radical music from the revolutionary '60s.
Brook Trout

"It's time we stop, hey, what's that sound? Everybody look what's going down." Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth" - January, 1967.

The Psychedelic Circus celebrates the spirit of protest. Get hep to the scene with Joan and the good doctor as they blitz the airwaves with radical music from the revolutionary '60s. You just might want to go wild in the streets!

Tune in on Montana Public Radio Friday, January 20 at 10:00 p.m, on your radio or online

This week's guests on "Musicians' Spotlight" are The Indigo Girls, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. They've spent the last 35 years performing together, producing fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one double platinum), and earning one Grammy and seven Grammy nominations while touring arenas, festivals, and clubs the world over. It's rare to find musicians playing together for so long; their music endures in the hearts of several generations of dedicated fans and continues to inspire young musicians.

Terell Stafford In Aarhus Denmark (2012)
Hreinn Gudlaugsson (CC-BY-4)

Tune in January 11 for a very special "What I Like About Jazz" as we're joined by trumpet player and educator Terell Stafford.

In his 25 years as a recording artist, and more than 30 years as an educator, Stafford has toured the world, performed in both small groups and appeared in the Dizzy Gillespie Alumni Big Band, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and been a longstanding member of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.

As a recording artist, Stafford has more than 130 albums to his credit, including multiple Grammy nominations and wins.

Join host John Arvish on "What I Like About Jazz" for a conversation with Terell Stafford, Wednesday, January 11, from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Joseph Navas

Singer-songwriter Jeffrey Foucault has taken "the small roads," building his independent career through a relentless international touring schedule and his critically-acclaimed recordings. The New Yorker praises his work as "Stark, literate songs that are as wide-open as the landscape of his native Midwest." Foucault joins John Floridis on this episode of "Musician's Spotlight."

2016 was such a good year for music and yet, also, such a shocking year for music. It was filled with strong, energized, and interesting releases from well-established artists, as well as some exciting, new talents, many of whom were rediscovering and modernizing classic, old sounds. 

Van Gelder was closely associated with Blue Note Records, an American jazz record label.
FLICKR USER, TIM (CC-BY-2.0)

Take a look at any jazz recording made during the past sixty years and there’s a good chance that it will have been recorded by Rudy Van Gelder. From his studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, Van Gelder worked with artists like Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Herbie Hancock to produce some of the most memorable music of all time. Join Tom Engelmann as he pays tribute to the engineer who made recorded music come to life on another edition of "Unsung Heroes, Influential but Overlooked Masters of Modern Music."

Tune in to MTPR Monday, January 9 at 8:00 p.m. on your radio or online

It takes about 24 songs to fill a typical Freeforms Show. Less if you’re playing a lot of Carla Bley. I bring in 26 in case the show runs short, but invariably I never get around to playing the last two. They’re the "tail end" to Freeforms.

Now – let’s do some math. With 12 shows a year and 2 extra songs per show. Ca-Ching! That’s right! This show just made itself! It’s like it was meant to be! 

Dolce Canto began in 2001 with eight friends who missed the a cappella compositions they'd studied and performed together in high school and college. On a whim, they decided to gather and read through some works. One public concert led to another.

The American Piano Quartet from left to right:  Scott Holden, Robin Hancock, Del Parkinson, Jeffrey Shumway.
Josh Burnham

"If you've ever heard a piano quartet performed, chances are the piece was either composed or arranged by these guys," says Christopher Hahn of the UM School of Music. "Two pianos, eight hands, the sound is truly symphonic. Nobody does it better."

The American Piano Quartet will be featured at the Celebrate Piano series from the UM School of Music on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at the Dennison Theater in Missoula. They'll perform at 7:30 p.m. They stopped by Montana Public Radio to give a taste of what they have planned.

Influential singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has died at the age of 82, according to a publicist for his U.S. record label.

Cohen died Monday, but news of his death came out late Thursday. His Facebook page had this announcement:

"It is with profound sorrow we report that legendary poet, songwriter and artist, Leonard Cohen has passed away.
We have lost one of music's most revered and prolific visionaries.

Violinist Tim Fain
Briana Blasko

"Any composer who is dead deserves to be revered beyond the point where you know you are nothing compared to them. I grew up a little bit in that culture at Juilliard and at Curtis. I've since realized that it's much more fun to not think that way." -  violinist Tim Fain.

Helena Symphony director Allan R. Scott talks music, collaboration, and virtual reality with Tim Fain, prior to the latter's recital with pianist Simone Dinnerstein, "Fresh Ink And First Loves," on Friday, Nov. 4 at 8:00 p.m. at Hamilton High School in Hamilton, MT, part of the Bitterroot Performing Arts Series.

Start your "All Hallows Eve" celebration early this year with a special Halloween edition of The Psychedelic Circus. Dr. Sandoz and Joan Richarde will provide musical tricks and treats for your 'Psychedelic' listening pleasure this Friday, October 28 from 10:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. Put on your costume, light the candles and tune in.

While visiting Montana’s House of Mystery in Columbia Falls, Wednesday Free Forms host Gus Chambers inexplicably vanished. Local authorities could give no reason for the curious phenomenon.

From R&B to country, the music business was profoundly influenced by the capable artistry of Chips Moman. Starting out as a guitarist, songwriter and producer for Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and Solomon Burke, he turned to pop and then country as he helped revive the career of Elvis Presley before working with Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash.

As part of the Juilliard-trained, multiple award-winning Ahn Trio (with her sisters Lucia, pianist and Maria, cellist), violinist Angella Ahn has been at the forefront of artists keeping the piano trio repertoire alive and thriving. The Ahn Trio is known for its performances of new classical pieces and genre-crossing collaborations with Mark O'Connor, Michael Nyman, Pat Metheny, and Bryan Adams.

Cuban choir Cantores de Cienfuegos sings during a live performance on Montana Public Radio Wednesday, July 13, 2016.
Josh Burnham

Did you enjoy  the Cantores de Cienfuegos Cuban choir at Missoula's 2016 International Choral Festival this summer? Want to hear more from them? Yvonne Gritzner helped bring the choir to Montana, and she has the details on a "Cuban Encore" benefit to help fund the travel costs for bringing this extraordinary group to Montana.

The Missoula Symphony Presents "Fast Machine" Sep. 24 & 25.
Courtesy Missoula Symphony

While John Adams' digital sound may seem an odd fit with Mendelssohn's romantic style, the Missoula Symphony finds connections in the contrast. The opening concert of the symphony's 62nd season, entited, "Fast Machine," juxtaposes "machine, motion and rhythm" with "fluidity and majesty," and features guest violinist Jennifer Frautschi peforming Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No.1. 

Left to right: MTPR Program Director Michael Marsolek, UM Professor of Piano Christopher Hahn, Helena Symphony Concertmaster Stephen Cepeda, and Helena Symphony Conductor Allan R. Scott.
Josh Burnham

Helena Symphony Concertmaster Stephen Cepeda and Conductor Allan R. Scott preview the symphony's 2016 season, and Cepeda and Christopher Hahn play some excerpts from Erich Korngold's lushly romantic 1945 violin concerto, live from Studio B at Montana Public Radio.

Host John Arvish continues to explore the six-decades-long career of engineer Rudy Van Gelder Wednesday on "What I Like About Jazz," starting at 8:00 p.m.

After moving into his own studio at Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Van Gelder continued his long relationship with Blue Note Records, as the primary engineer on most of their hundreds of sessions between 1953 and 1967.

He also developed a relationship with the newly-formed Impulse Records. Among his many sessions there, Van Gelder recorded nearly all of John Coltrane's records up until his death. He also did pivotal sessions with J.J. Johnson, Yusef Lateef, McCoy Tyner and numerous others.

Watch: Rabbit Wilde Live From Studio-B

Sep 12, 2016
Rabbit Wilde live from Studio-B at Montana Public Radio, September 9, 2016.
Josh Burnham

Rabbit Wilde was at Montana Public Radio Friday for a foot-tapping, head-nodding live session featuring their signature brand of folk rock from the Pacific Northwest. Try not to howl along as they play their song, "Howl".

Andrew Bird with violin, 2009. Credit Dani Cantó (CC-BY-SA-2)
Dani Cantó (CC-BY-SA-2)

Multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Andrew Bird spoke with MTPR's Clare Menahan before his show in Missoula earlier this month. Hailing from Lake Forest, Illinois, Bird is a classically trained violinist who also  incorporates guitar, glockenspiel — and whistling — into his music.

From humble beginnings in Moscow, ID, acclaimed singer-songwriter Josh Ritter recorded and released his self-titled debut in 1999 after graduating from Oberlin College with a self-created “American History Through Narrative Folk Music” major. His albums have been praised for their beautifully spare songwriting, textured imagery and simple lyrics.

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