MTPR

Music

Music, artist interviews, and upcoming performances around western Montana.

Zach Cooper, Margaret Nichols Baldridge and Christopher Hahn perform trios for violin, horn and piano by Mozart and Brahms, live on Montana Public Radio.
Josh Burnham

Zach Cooper, Margaret Nichols Baldridge and Christopher Hahn perform trios for violin, horn and piano by Mozart and Brahms, live on Montana Public Radio.

Bruce Anfinson, "Montana's Musical Ambassador."
Courtesy bruceanfinson.com

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle calls Bruce Anfinson "Montana's Musical Ambassador." Bruce's ballads and tales of ranching life, draft horses and wildfires reflect his native Montana roots. He's the guest on this episode of "Musican's Spotlight."

MTPR Program Director Michael Marsolek recently hosted The Folk Show on MTPR. He talked with Sierra Hull about her pending trip to Montana, and the first time they met. She was Just 15 years old when MTPR broadcast her set from the first year of the National Folk Festival in Butte in 2008. Listen in to their conversation now.

Emily Remler at Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, California.
Brianmcmillen (CC BY-SA 3.0)

We all know of many great women in jazz, but usually what comes to mind are the singers- Ella, Billie, Sarah, Dinah, we could list dozens of great ones. Most people can name at least a couple of piano players, too; Marian McPartland and Mary Lou Williams quickly come to mind.

But what about all the other instruments associated with jazz?

For more than a decade and a half, the members of Greensky Bluegrass have created their own version of bluegrass music, mixing the acoustic stomp of a stringband with the rule-breaking spirit of rock & roll. They redefine that sound once again with their sixth album, Shouted, Written Down & Quoted.

Multiple Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter returns to Musicians’ Spotlight for a conversation with John Floridis from her Virginia home, highlighting her most recent recording, the critically-acclaimed album, "The Things That We Are Made Of."

Get hep to the scene with Joan and the good doctor as they blitz the airwaves with radical music from the revolutionary '60s.
Brook Trout

"It's time we stop, hey, what's that sound? Everybody look what's going down." Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth" - January, 1967.

The Psychedelic Circus celebrates the spirit of protest. Get hep to the scene with Joan and the good doctor as they blitz the airwaves with radical music from the revolutionary '60s. You just might want to go wild in the streets!

Tune in on Montana Public Radio Friday, January 20 at 10:00 p.m, on your radio or online

This week's guests on "Musicians' Spotlight" are The Indigo Girls, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. They've spent the last 35 years performing together, producing fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one double platinum), and earning one Grammy and seven Grammy nominations while touring arenas, festivals, and clubs the world over. It's rare to find musicians playing together for so long; their music endures in the hearts of several generations of dedicated fans and continues to inspire young musicians.

Terell Stafford In Aarhus Denmark (2012)
Hreinn Gudlaugsson (CC-BY-4)

Tune in January 11 for a very special "What I Like About Jazz" as we're joined by trumpet player and educator Terell Stafford.

In his 25 years as a recording artist, and more than 30 years as an educator, Stafford has toured the world, performed in both small groups and appeared in the Dizzy Gillespie Alumni Big Band, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and been a longstanding member of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.

As a recording artist, Stafford has more than 130 albums to his credit, including multiple Grammy nominations and wins.

Join host John Arvish on "What I Like About Jazz" for a conversation with Terell Stafford, Wednesday, January 11, from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Joseph Navas

Singer-songwriter Jeffrey Foucault has taken "the small roads," building his independent career through a relentless international touring schedule and his critically-acclaimed recordings. The New Yorker praises his work as "Stark, literate songs that are as wide-open as the landscape of his native Midwest." Foucault joins John Floridis on this episode of "Musician's Spotlight."

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