MTPR

Music

Music, artist interviews, and upcoming performances around western Montana.

When Camila Meza moved to New York in 2009 from her native Chile, American jazz fans discovered her rare combination of talents; Meza is a singer, guitar player, songwriter and arranger. Her expressive phrasing and unique vocal timbre, combined with soulful improvisations on the guitar, take us on a joyful musical journey full of beauty and adventure.

Darrell Scott is one of the luminaries of "Americana" and American folk music; he’s a multi-instrumentalist, an award-winning songwriter, and a powerful interpreter of songs of all stripes. Scott’s most recent recording project, "Ten," lies very close to his heart; it's ten songs by the late Montana doctor/singer-songwriter, Ben Bullington, with whom Scott struck up a close friendship in the last years of Bullington's life. 

Bruce Spiegel spent eight years collecting interviews and material for the film "Bill Evans, Time Remembered" which screens Sunday, February 28, at 12:30 p.m. at the Top Hat in Missoula as part of the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival. Tune in to "What I Like About Jazz" Wednesday, Feb. 24 at 8:00 p.m. to hear from Spiegel about what went into making the film and what makes Bill Evans so special.

Michael Marsolek talks with cellist Fern Glass Boyd and violinist Carrie Krause about the February 21, 2016 performance of the String Orchestra of the Rockies, 7:30 p.m. at the Music Recital Hall in the School of Music at the University of Montana-Missoula.

Suffering from cabin fever?  Have the winter doldrums got you staring at blank walls? The Psychedelic Circus rolls back into Montana Public Radio Friday February 19, from 10:00 p.m. - midnight. Dr. Sandoz & Joan Richarde will be spinning obscure gems from the psychedelic era to surround you in a "musical meltdown" that's sure to liven up your Friday night & transport you to a higher plane!  Tune in, turn down the lights, and let the music take you away.

Starting in 1949, Howard Rumsey helped introduce the world to what would eventually be called “West Coast Jazz” at the Lighthouse in Hermosa Beach, California.  During the ensuing several decades the venue would provide a stage for artists like Lee Morgan, Grant Green, Joe Henderson and Rumsey’s own group, The Lighthouse All-Stars. 

More than forty years after he founded the legendary Kronos Quartet, violinist David Harrington's passion for string music - and his drive for nailing a live performance - is stronger than ever. Harrington recalls the origins of the pioneering quartet's vision and reflects on the diversity of musical styles represented in its huge repertoire of commissioned works.

What band practice looks like when members are spread over 3 cities.
Courtesy Modality

Although they live in three cities (Missoula, Butte, and Blacksburg) in two states (Montana and Virginia), the five members of the band Modality practice every Thursday evening.

Houston Person on the sax in 2006.
Steve Mynett (CC-BY-2)

This week on "What I Like About Jazz:" a tribute to the tenor sax, with a spotlight on two of the masters, Gene Ammons and Houston Person.

When conductor Allan R. Scott first met Claire Huangci, the ten-year-old pianist from Philadelphia was a contestant in a major piano competition, and Scott was president of the competition's jury. Huangci won, and she and Scott performed with six different orchestras all over the U.S.

The band Snarky Puppy has been described as "a truly different kind of musical animal."  Once Texas’s best-kept musical secret, they’ve become a Grammy-winning jazz, funk world, soul and pop combo, collecting fans like Prince and Pat Metheny along the way. Their most recent recording, a collaboration with Metropol Orkest, a Dutch orchestra, has topped Billboard charts in several categories.

Gus Chambers tells Morning Classics host, Susan Israel “Hey!  Scooch over a little bit.  It’s time for  Freeforms”.

Chambers races to the station the fourth Wednesday of every month to host Freeforms, a gritty mix of funk, blues, country, seedy taverns and flickering street lamps.

The rain soaked streets will be safe this Wednesday between 11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

Israel responds, “Who’s driving this crate?  Me or You?

Tune in to Wednesday Freeforms at 11:00 a.m. on your radio or online.

This week on "What I Like About Jazz", Director of Jazz Studies Rob Tapper sits in again. This time, for a tribute to drummer Jeff Hamilton, whose trio plays at The University of Montana on February 6.

Pianist Tanya Gabrielian at Montana Public Radio
Josh Burnham

Hear pianist Tanya Gabrielian playing works by Bach, Glinka, Chopin and Sarasate live from MTPR studios this morning.

Host John Floridis gets reacquainted with singer-songwriter (and past “Musicians’ Spotlight” guest) Patty Griffin. They discuss the making of her recent recording, "Servant of Love," as well as what it means to be a middle-aged artist.

All Mixed Up With Martin Luther King Jr.

Jan 14, 2016
"A Shortcut Back to Washington 1963" Monday January 18, 8:00 p.m. on MTPR.
(PD)

Join Martin Luther King Jr on "A Shortcut Back to Washington 1963" with the voices, sounds and music that were popular as activists marched on Washington, including Mahalia Jackson, "Little" Stevie Wonder, the Rooftop Singers, JFK, Walter Cronkite, the Four Seasons, Peter, Paul & Mary, Pete Seeger and 4th Grade Students from the Hudson Valley.

Tune in Monday January 18 at 8:00 p.m. on your radio or online.

Considered by many to be the world's foremost steel guitarist, he not only played, but perfected the instrument, designing the Emmons Guitar. His musical versatility spanned genres such as country, swing, jazz, folk, and country-rock, and he performed or recorded with a wide variety of vocalists and musicians including Ernest Tubb, John Hartford, Ray Price, Judy Collins, and George Strait.

Holiday Freeforms With Gus Chambers

Dec 22, 2015

Set your smart phone for Gus’ 'Wednesday Freeforms'.
Today’s holiday special is ORANGE. Combining the warmth of RED and the cheerfulness of YELLOW.
Wednesday, December 23, 11:00 a.m. on Montana Public Radio.

The Missoula jazz fusion quartet The Captain Wilson Conspiracy make their first (and possibly last) appearance on "Musicians’ Spotlight." Steve Kalling, Keaton Wilson, and Ed Stalling talk with John Floridis about the challenge of keeping a collaborative music project vibrant and current while its members maintain their "day" jobs - or graduate from Ph.D. programs and get jobs elsewhere.

Tune in to "What I Like About Jazz" Wednesday night at 8:00 as jazz artists interpret the songs of Stephen Sondheim. Artists as wide ranging as Herbie Hancock, Eden Atwood, Holly Cole, Sarah Vaughan, Bill Mays and Kurt Elling show their chops.

The Snowman: Music & Words by Howard Blake
Great Falls Symphony

Sunday, December 6 at 3:00 p.m., the Great Falls Orchestra and Symphony Choir presents "The Snowman: Music & Words by Howard Blake. "Pea Green Boat" host Annie Garde will be on stage announcing for the show.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the release of RUBBER SOUL, and because there are so many great covers out there, "What I Like About Jazz" pays tribute to the Beatles this week. From Grant Green to Tony Williams and Count Basie to modernists like David Kikoski and Brad Mehldau, jazz artists as far back as 1964 have covered the Beatles.

John Floridis caught up with guitarist-composer-bandleader Dweezil Zappa during Dweezil’s stint at the 2015 Crown of the Continent Guitar Festival in Bigfork, MT. As the "Zappa plays Zappa" tour (a tribute to Dweezil’s late father, Frank Zappa) continues, he's released the first album of his own work in over a decade, "Via Zamatta'."

To mark the 50th anniversary of the release of The Beatles' landmark album "Rubber Soul", producer Paul Ingles presents another in his acclaimed series of specials on Beatles' history. Over a dozen musicians, music writers and Beatles fans comment on the significance of this 1965 release by the band.

Listen online or on your radio, Monday, Nov. 30 at 8:00 p.m. on MTPR

We'll pay special tribute to trombone players, including Curtis Fuller, JJ Johnson, Bob Brookmeyer, Frank Rosolino, and Steve Davis. But we'll also hear some great arrangers and some favorite tunes.

Join John Arvish and guest Rob Tapper, Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Montana, this week on What I Like About Jazz. That's Wednesday, November 25, from 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. on MTPR; online or on your radio.

Tune in to "Giving Thanks" a contemporary celebration of the spirit of Gratitude. Thursday November 26, at 7:00 p.m.
(PD)

Whether you're in the kitchen, on the road to a family gathering, or relaxing after the feast, "Giving Thanks" provides the perfect atmosphere for Thanksgiving: the warmth of great music, and truly memorable words. Tune in at 7:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving, online or on your radio.

Philip Aaberg kicks off the 2016 St. Timothy's Summer Music Festival, June 26.
Josh Burnham

Grammy & Emmy award winning Montana composer Philip Aaberg stopped by Montana Public Radio studios today to talk about his musical career, his upcoming performances, and of course, to play the piano. Listen in, and mark your calendar for these upcoming shows.

Join host Marguerite Munsche Sunday evening, November 22, 2015, for our second broadcast from the Missoula Symphony Orchestra and Chorale's 61st season. Darko Butorac is the orchestra's music director and conductor.

Dizzy Gillespie in concert, Deauville, Normandy, France
Roland Godefro (CC-BY-3)

American jazz artists, and indeed the jazz form have had a strong link with with Paris since the early days of jazz. This week on "What I Like About Jazz," we pay tribute to France's love of American jazz, with recordings made there by the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Donald Byrd, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and Dexter Gordon. We'll also hear from classic French artists including Michel LeGrand, Barney Wilen, Bobby Jaspar, and Jacques Loussier. Tune in Wednesday, November 18 from 8:00-10:00 p.m. on your radio or online.

This week on "Musicians' Spotlight:" “Wild Child doesn’t want a place to hide. Song after song, town after town, they’ll wear their hearts on their sleeves, addicted to the rush that only comes when thousands of strangers know all their secrets and sing them back, because they’re the audience's secrets, too.”  

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