MTPR

Music

Music, artist interviews, and upcoming performances around western Montana.

Sylvia Moy in 1967 with Stevie Wonder and James Jamerson, Earl Van Dyke and Robert White of the Funk Brothers.
Motown Records Archives

Without Sylvia Moy there may never have been a Stevie Wonder. A Motown songwriter and producer who collaborated with him on numerous hits, she is perhaps most known for co-writing "My Cherie Amour" and "I Was Born to Love Her." She also co-wrote hits for artists like Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Martha Reeves and the Vandellas and The Jackson Five. 

Join Tom Engelmann at 8:00 p.m., Monday, June 26 as he opens the Motown vaults to enjoy the works of Sylvia Moy on another edition of "Unsung Heroes, Influential but Overlooked Masters of Modern Music."

Portland, Oregon-based Blind Pilot has landed among the top indie-pop-folk bands in the country with television appearances on Ellen and The Late Show With David Letterman, and performances at Bonnaroo and the Newport Folk Festival. The band’s lead singer and primary songwriter Israel Nebeker visited with host John Floridis backstage at the Wilma Theater in Missoula to talk about the process of recording their most recent album, “And Then Like Lions."

Michael Wilson

“Banjoist, composer, instigator” and two-time Juno Award winner Jayme Stone makes music that's been inspired by sounds from around the world. His compositions bridge folk, jazz and chamber music, and his albums both defy and honor the banjo’s long role in the world’s music, turning historical connections into compelling sounds. Songlines calls Stone "The Yo-Yo Ma of the banjo."

One of the most dynamic singer-songwriters of any generation, Martin Sexton returns to “Musician's Spotlight,” recording three songs in the studio (with harmony help from the Brothers McCann) and chatting retrospectively about his career.

In a career spanning half a century, Bruce Lundvall worked with a wide variety of artists including Miles Davis, Dianne Reeves, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Norah Jones as the president of Blue Note Records. Phil Chess and his brother founded Chess Records, a storied Chicago label that captured great blues musicians like Muddy Waters in their prime and helped establish rock ’n’ roll as a musical genre. He even helped start the careers of Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones.

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