Native American

Montana Historical Society Press

Step out of a world governed by clocks and calendars and into the world of the Kootenai and Blackfeet peoples, whose traditional territories included the area that is now Glacier National Park. In this book, the Kootenai and Blackfeet tribes share their traditions—stories and legends, foodways and hunting techniques, games and spiritual beliefs. Readers will discover a new respect for the people who were at home in the Crown of the Continent, all around the seasons.

USDAgriculture State Director of Rural Development Anthony Preite awards a check to NACDC Financial Services Executive Director Angie Main.
Corin Cates-Carney

Small businesses in and around the Blackfeet Reservation now have access to a little more help. This week, for the first time, the U.S. Department of Agriculture extended support to a Native American community development group, to make “micro-loans” to boost the local economy.

Native Languages: From Forbidden To Funded

Apr 24, 2015
Courtesy Nkwusm Salish Language School

April Charlo is happy to hear that state lawmakers passed a bill yesterday supporting Native American language immersion programs in the public schools. Growing up on the Flathead Reservation, Charlo says the first time she had a chance to learn Salish was in the 7th grade.

“And I wanted more." Charlo says. "I couldn’t have more until high school, but then it was only, you know, that 50 minute block a day. To have an immersion program in public school would have just been amazing.”

Bill Funding Native Language Programs Passes

Apr 23, 2015
Courtesy Photo

A bill making Montana the second state in the nation to provide funds for Native language immersion programs in public schools passed in the legislature today. 

Helena, Montana, author Brian D'Ambrosio talks about his book Warrior in the Ring: The life of Marvin Camel, Native American world champion boxer.

About the book:

In the Golden Age of boxing, Marvin Camel, from the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, defied all obstacles of race, poverty, and geographical isolation to become the first Native American to win a world boxing title.

Transparency For Tribal Finances On Monday's Legislative Agenda

Feb 20, 2015
Montana Capitol
William Marcus

Monday, Montana legislators will hear a bill to create a website so state tribal members can see the who, what, where and when of the money coming into the tribe.

Republican Representative Bruce Meyers of Box Elder says it’s important that Native American citizens get the same open government systems as other Montanans.

“We’re providing tribal members as Montana citizens transparency about budgets.”

Many question how much money goes to federal and state governments, worrying about corruption higher up in the chain.

During this program, four Montana Indian authors talk about their stories published in Off the Path: An Anthology of 21st Century Montana American Indian Writers, Vol. I.

Sherman Alexie is not the only American Indian writer. Nor does the experience of one Indian represent the experiences of all Natives living in urban areas and reservations across the U.S.

That point of view, plus insights into American Indian culture and tribal differences, is part of the discussion during this program.

"Pow-wow Fever"

Jun 23, 2014

In a few days it strikes
Everyone in Indian Country,
Be Canada or wherever.

Drums vibrating,
The high pitched tones carry a chant.

Laughter of children,
Whispering of lovers,
Not too old or young to join.
Tipis, tents, campers and trailers
Stand symbolic as the sun sets.

The night carries many songs:
Contests, 49's, doorway songs and
owl songs,
"I will take you home,
in my one-eyed Ford!"

Historian, teacher, and poet Joseph McGeshick talks about Montana’s Native American poets and about what’s happening on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. He also read a few of his poems.

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.

"Dreaming Winter"

Jan 20, 2014

Don't ask me if these knives are real.
I could paint a king or show a map
the way home—to go like this:
Wobble me back to a tiger's dream
a dream of knives and bones too common
to be exposed. My secrets are ignored.

Here comes the man I love. His coat is wet
and his face is falling like the leaves,
tobacco stains on his Polish teeth.
I could tell jokes about him—one up
for the man who brags a lot, laughs
a little and hangs his name on the nearest knob.
Don't ask me. I know it's only hunger.

During this program, Minerva Allen talks with TWQ producer Chérie Newman about her role as a guardian of tribal culture. She also reads from her collection of poetry, Nakoda Sky People, and from Stories from the Elders: Nakoda Horse Society.