MTPR

Native Americans

Women and girls in Indian country go missing and are involved in homicides at a far greater rate than any other demographic of people in Montana. That’s according to testimony today in the legislative State-Tribal Relations Committee, which is studying the issue. 

Marita Growing Thunder (right) walks along Hillside Rd in honor  of missing and murdered indigenous women on March 27. Tuesday was day three of a four day 80 mile walk.
Nicky Ouellet

A young artist and activist is wrapping up a four-day walk across the Flathead reservation Thursday to bring attention to violence against Native American women.

Sign saying "Welcome to Blackfeet Indian Country."
Will Marlow (CC-BY-NC-2)

The Montana Department of Commerce is creating a new position to promote tourism in Indian Country.

Casey Lozar with the Department of Commerce says the new Tribal Tourism Officer will develop culturally appropriate visitor orientation and tourism services in cooperation with the eight Native American nations in Montana.

Anna Whiting Sorrell is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, and works for their health department
Mike Albans / NPR

Today, NPR’s Morning Edition aired a story about discrimination Native Americans face when trying to get healthcare in America. It included an interview with Anna Whiting Sorrell, a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.

We’re going to follow up now by looking at some of the persistent myths about American Indians that get in the way of them getting healthcare.

Three bills aimed at helping Indian tribes passed the Senate yesterday, and one of them is going to President Donald Trump’s desk. All three were sponsored by Democratic Senator Jon Tester.

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