MTPR

natural selection

Pronghorn antelope at the National Bison Range.
Josh Burnham

Pronghorn are unusual because their twins are the only surviving winners in some pretty serious battles within the womb. Soon after fertilization, there can be more than seven developing embryos, which begin to elongate in what pronghorn biologists call the “thread-stage.” These thread-like embryos literally entangle and often knot together till they pull each other apart. Wenfei Tong explains in this episode of "Field Notes":

The Good Show

Jul 31, 2015

08/07/2015 - In this episode, a question that haunted Charles Darwin: if natural selection boils down to survival of the fittest, how do you explain why one creature might stick its neck out for another? Is altruism an aberration, or just an elaborate guise for sneaky self-interest? Do we really live in a selfish, dog-eat-dog world? Or has evolution carved out a hidden code that rewards genuine cooperation?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/103951-the-good-show/

The Good Show

Jan 27, 2014

12/21/2013 - In this episode, a question that haunted Charles Darwin: if natural selection boils down to survival of the fittest, how do you explain why one creature might stick its neck out for another?  Is altruism an aberration, or just an elaborate guise for sneaky self-interest?  Do we really live in a selfish, dog-eat-dog world?  Or has evolution carved out a hidden code that rewards genuine cooperation?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/103951-the-good-show/