Oil

An onlooker watches as Matt Roberts and Jason Begay, center, interview Syracuse journalism student Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, about her eyewitness account of the clash between protestors and Dakota Access Pipeline security  on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016.
Courtesy Olivia Vanni/Montana Journalism Review

There are now thousands of people protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota. Last weekend, a team of student reporters from the University of Montana made the 12-hour drive to the Sacred Stone Camp to cover the media’s coverage of the protest.

The protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota are drawing hundreds of people from across the country, including Montana’s Indian reservations.
Courtesy Orlando Avery

Audio Pending...

The protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota are drawing hundreds of people from across the country, including Montana’s Indian reservations. MTPR's Nicky Ouellet spoke with a Flathead Reservation resident who’s there now.

In September 2012, Ken Ilgunas stuck out his thumb in Denver, Colorado, and hitchhiked 1,500 miles north to the Alberta tar sands. After being duly appalled, he commenced to walk nearly 2,000 miles, (mostly) following the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, from Alberta to the Texas Gulf Coast.

It would become a 4.5 month journey across the Great Plains. To follow the pipe, he couldn't take roads. Instead, he walked across fields, grasslands, and private property. He had to trespass across America.

Blue Rider Press

In September 2012, Ken Ilgunas stuck out his thumb in Denver, Colorado, and hitchhiked 1,500 miles north to the Alberta tar sands. After being duly appalled, he commenced to walk nearly 2,000 miles, (mostly) following the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, from Alberta to the Texas Gulf Coast.

Climate Activists Debate Over Tactics

May 3, 2016
About 60 people gathered on the Yellowstone County Courthouse lawn to promote renewable energy. The March 29, 2016 rally was sponsored by the Northern Plains Resource Council.
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

The debate about whether or not humans are warming the planet is essentially over – 97 percent of climate scientists agree that we are. But the debate over tactics, about how to reduce our carbon emissions, is just starting to heat up.

Why Energy's Dirty Air Pollution Costs Are Dropping

Mar 31, 2016
(PD)

We often hear about the economic costs of environmental regulation on the energy industry. But there’s a flipside to that equation — the price society pays for pollution. One scientist has added up those costs — and found they’re going down. For Inside Energy, the Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier went to find out why.

Renewable Energy Missing From Montana Energy Conference Says NPRC

Mar 29, 2016
About 60 people gathered on the Yellowstone County Courthouse lawn to promote renewable energy. The March 29, 2016 rally was sponsored by the Northern Plains Resource Council.
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

About 60 people gathered during a wet snowstorm on the Yellowstone County Courthouse lawn to rally for renewable energy. The event was scheduled to coincide with Senator Steve Daines’ Montana Energy Conference.  

The Solenex well site in the Badger-Two Medicine area.
Corin Cates-Carney

The Obama administration has canceled a long disputed oil and gas lease in the Badger-Two Medicine area of the Lewis and Clark National Forest, a few miles from Glacier National Park.

A few miles outside Glacier National Park in northwest Montana is land known as the Badger-Two Medicine, the ancestral home of the Blackfeet tribe.

But it's also the site of 18 oil and gas development leases, and an energy company is heading to federal court March 10 to fight for the right to drill there after decades of delay.

Blackfeet tribal historian John Murray doesn't want the drilling to begin.

Proposed Rules Target Oil, Gas Waste On Public Lands

Jan 22, 2016
Oil pump.
Dan Boyce

The federal government today proposed new rules to reduce the amount of natural gas released into the atmosphere from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands.

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