MTPR

Open Aid Alliance

Young people account for a substantion proportion of new STIs, and face unique risk factors.
Centers for Disease Control

Tonight we take a closer look at people impacted by the state’s most common sexually transmitted infection, chlamydia. The state health department says Montana is on track for over 4,000 cases of chlamydia by year’s end.

Amanda Reese with a naloxone kit. Reese works at Missoula’s Open Aid Alliance, which operates a needle exchange and other health services.
Edward O'Brien

A lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses is now more widely available in Montana. State health officials today highlighted that, thanks to a new law that went into effect in October.

The law, passed this spring with unanimous support, makes it possible for nearly anyone to get a prescription for the medication, called naloxone. That includes friends and family members of a person at risk of overdose, first responders, and other organizations like needle exchanges.