pain

Bob Mason and his dog Sophie.
courtesy

When Bob Mason decided to end his life with a self-inflicted gunshot, his pain helped him pull the trigger.

Mason died in January. He was 67 years old. His daughter, Shane Mieski, says her father had been without pain-killing drugs for about a week when he died.

Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook waiting in Dr. Forest Tennant’s office in West Covina, California.
Corin Cates-Carney

Over the past two decades, the rate of overdose deaths from prescription painkillers known as opioids has quadrupled in the United States. Federal authorities say 78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. Health care officials in Montana report that the abuse here is worse than the national average. But the casualties of the opioid epidemic are not all addicts and drug abusers.

Members of the Sexual Assault Evidence Kit task force met for the first time Tuesday at the capitol.
William Marcus

  Today state lawmakers heard from chronic pain patients who want to reform Montana’s policy regarding access to pain medications like opioids.

Casey Brock from Glendive and Terri Anderson from Hamilton call the reform ‘The Montana Pain Patients’ Bill of Rights."

Pills
(PD)

A group of pain patients testifying before state lawmakers Friday says Montana has become a hostile place for people who suffer from chronic pain.

Flickr user, free photos

Mistletoe, a parasitic plant that grows on a wide range of host trees, shows up on every continent but Antarctica - and on each continent, it's been used in folk medicine. From ancient Greece into twentieth-century America, it was prescribed for epilepsy. Over the centuries, healers have used mistletoe to treat arthritis, menstrual problems, miscarriage (through controlling bleeding), hypertension, and pain - and that's just the short list. It's prescribed frequently in Europe. But don't try any of these uses without a trained health practitioner, because mistletoe can be toxic.

Willow: Tree Bark That Begat Aspirin

Dec 6, 2013

December 7th & 9th, 2013: Willow, the original source of aspirin, is still prescribed by herbalists, particularly for urinary tract infections and muscle pain.

http://www.floradelaterre.com/