MTPR

painting

Paintings on display at the 'Stomp The Stigma' art show at the Western Montana Mental Health Center.
Nicky Ouellet

For Fred Waters, painting isn’t so much about crafting a perfect piece of art for others to see. Instead, painting gives him a chance to quiet the constant racket in his head and focus on one detail at a time.

"For a few of us, the painting is a way to express feelings or allow ourself to have certain feelings. Because like for me, life gets overwhelmingly scary and there’s a lot of stuff I want to numb out and don't deal with anymore," he says.

Book Cover / Copper Canyon Press

"When I heard back from the Tranströmers over a year or two later, one of the things that Monica was telling me was, 'Tomas was just so taken by the fact that you’re a working class guy.' And you know, no one’s ever thinking 'This’ll get me a seat at the table for a famous European poet: telling him that my dad’s a logger.' But I think it’s germane to my relationship to his work: he’s a working class guy raised by a single mother and he walked through the sub-zero streets of Stockholm every day to go to work. So I think putting your real foot forward is different than putting your best foot forward, and I think that’s how I made my connection with Tomas and his family. "  -- Michael McGriff

Poet Michael McGriff discusses his connection to Tomas Tranströmer as well as his latest book, "Early Hour," on this episode of The Write Question.

 

Restored From Ashes: John Mix Stanley's West

May 31, 2015

Before 1850, paintings and the first black and white photographs provided the sole source of visual imagery of the West to Americans. Among the most remarkable of the explorer-painters employed by government expeditions and railway surveys was John Mix Stanley, whose wanderlust and technical prowess as a draftsman and portrait painter - as well as timing - put him in a position to paint American Indians just as their traditional ways of life had begun to collide with westward American expansion.