MTPR

poetry

Zan Bockes

For the Lost

 

You’ve been turning right

at every corner; the sooty night

 

tangles your hair.  If the moon were out

you’d be making wishes, but doubt

 

strings lines across your eyes,

makes neon signs a disguise

 

for gold.  The wind is so cold it cuts

like dry ice wires, struts

 

and whips the newspapers down

the street in rolling stampede.  You drown

 

your teeth in Old Crow, bite

the sorrow on your tongue in two, tight

Red ruby embers burn,

Degradation in the form of creation,

It twists and winds and turns. 

-- Derek Hann

"Bad Summon" explores the relationship between the majesty of nature and the quiet violence humans inflict upon themselves and others. The poems are dipped in loss, traveling between death and mountains, romance and rivers. They are addicted to the truth of experience and the energy behind regret. "Bad Summon" conjures its own ghost. According to David Baker, the judge who selected the winning manuscript, this is a “surprising, coherent, original collection of lyric poems. I felt peril, heartbreak, catastrophe, sorrow, genuine soulfulness. It’s also funny, yet its humor is not comic but possesses a terrible gravity.” This is a volume every poetry lover will want to explore.

The Bunch Grass Motel

Jan 23, 2018
Mary Beth Gloege

MUSING THE LOG CABIN

 

Some kitchen mornings

through time-warped window glass,

I saw mountain bluebirds

in their luminous coats

flutter and feed from post to post.

 

Living room afternoons

carried the whistles

and yeeps of robins,

harvesting fat earthworms

from fields of swaying grass.

 

Evenings above the cement stoop

held violet-green swallows,

darting swept-back wings

through the rising dark, rife

with star-shine and shadow.

 

"They do say women are most at risk of being beat up during the Super Bowl, statistically. So I was just thinking, when are men most dangerous? And it seems—I could put war in there—but when that kind of energy is clustered and then what does the Great Mother of the Animals think of that?" -- Melissa Kwasny

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