Ponderosa pine

Ponderosa Pine Bark: Rocky Mountain Aromatherapy

Aug 15, 2016
Flickr user Tim Jones (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The bark of any tree is more than just a good-looking façade. Even the most graceful aspen or stately ponderosa requires bark to protect its sensitive inner flesh from disease, parasites, and other environmental stresses, such as fire.  Much like our skin, this outer layer is a necessity to protect the biological functions occurring within its protective covering. 

This week on "Pea Green Boat" we're talking about Montana's state symbols. If you're listening from anywhere in western Montana, chances are you can find many of these symbols on a short walk out your door. Check out these state symbols, and tune in to "Pea Green Boat" all week at 4:00 p.m. to learn more.

Wolf Moss: Wallpaper Of The World's Forests

Mar 21, 2016
Wolf Moss
Claire Burgeson

Although small and unobtrusive, an estimated 13,000 to 17,000 species of lichen spread across the Earth, from the Arctic to the equatorial tropics. One of those species, more noticeable than most, is Letharia vulpina, a brilliant fluorescent yellow-green, moss-like lichen that clings to the bark and wood of living and dead trees throughout the world, from sea level to timberline.

Some Predict Ponderosas May Be At Risk For Pine Beetle Infestations
SFU Public Affairs and Media Relations, Flickr

Bark beetles over the past two decades have devastated millions of acres of North America’s best lodgepole and whitebark pine stands.

The University of Montana’s Diana Six predicts ponderosa pine stands are getting ripe for mountain and western pine beetle infestations.

"The ponderosas are a lot more drought tolerant than lodgepole. They’ve been able to handle the warming and drying that we’ve had, but now that the trees are becoming more stressed that’s allowing beetles that attack those trees (Ponderosa).”

The Scotty Brown Fire, seen on August 11, 2015.
Inciweb

July of 2015 was the warmest month on record in the history of our planet, 2015 is on trend to be our warmest recorded year, and in much of the American west that warmth has been coupled with moderate to extreme drought conditions.

With emissions of greenhouse gases showing no sign of decreasing, these records will probably not last long. For Montana, it means that our overall climate is likely to get warmer and drier.

Lycogala epidendrum, also known as "wolf's milk slime".
Benny Mazur (CC-BY-2.0)

Slime molds are stubbornly mysterious. They are usually lumped in with fungi, but exhibit several traits ordinarily attributed to animals. One of these stands out above the others: slime molds travel.

View of a treated ponderosa pine plot in 2009, twenty-five years after selection cutting and prescribed burning.
Courtesy Carl Fiedler

A new book about ponderosa pine trees, written by a pair of Montana forest researchers, offers insight into past mistakes and current policies.

Flickr user Tim Jones (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The bark of any tree is more than just a good-looking facade. Even the most graceful aspen or stately ponderosa requires bark to protect its sensitive inner flesh from disease, parasites, and other environmental stresses, such as fire.

Tree Bark

Jun 20, 2014
Jami Dwyer

6/22/14 & 6/23/14: This week on "Fieldnotes:" "Tree Bark," written by Peter Lesica, read by Anne Garde.