MTPR

Racism

A float in the Helena Vigilante Day parade depicting the Madison Buffalo Jump has been criticized by the ACLU and others for its portrayal of Native Americans.
Courtesy Meg Singer

One of the longest-running high school parades in the United States has been criticized by the ACLU and others for its portrayal of Native Americans.

“This is racism, 21st century racism," says Meg Singer, a Helena resident and member of the Navajo Nation.

She says Helena High School students at the Vigilante Day Parade last Friday dressed in Hollywood-style Native American costumes with short skirts and other scantily-clad clothing.

Whitefish, MT rail depot.
Flickr user Roy Luck (CC-BY-2)

Leave your guns at home.

That’s the message Whitefish City Manager Chuck Stearns sent to neo-Nazi organizers, who proposed an armed march against the city last month.

Whitefish, MT rail depot.
Flickr user Roy Luck (CC-BY-2)

The neo-Nazi website proposing an armed march through Whitefish on Martin Luther King Day now says it's postponing its planned demonstration, after failing to submit a complete event permit application earlier this week.

People gathered in Whitefish's Depot Park for a "Love Not Hate" Rally Saturday, January 7, 2017.
Nicky Ouellet

City managers in Whitefish say they’ve received an application for a special event permit from a neo-Nazi website. But, it’s incomplete.

A few weeks ago, the Daily Stormer proposed an armed march against Jewish families and businesses in Whitefish in January.

Whitefish Police Chief Bill Dial addressing the Glacier Country Pachyderm Club in Kalispell Friday
Nicky Ouellet

Whitefish Chief of Police Bill Dial says he’s doubtful a threatened armed march through Whitefish will actually happen.

A neo-Nazi website is calling for the march on Martin Luther King Day.

Whitefish, MT rail depot.
Flickr user Roy Luck (CC-BY-2)

A group in Whitefish is hosting a so-called "Love Not Hate" rally Saturday, January 7. Organizers are calling the event a stand against oppression.

City commissioners in Great Falls passed a resolution Tuesday supporting the city and citizens of Whitefish.

Nearly 1,000 people came to UM to see Patrisse Cullors of Black Lives Matter,  Nov. 2, 2016
Cole Grant

Last night, nearly 1,000 people came to the University of Montana to hear a key player in the Black Lives Matter movement speak. Patrisse Cullors was invited for UM’s annual “Diverse U” conference.

Philip Haney addresses a packed house at an ACT For America event in Polson Montana, Nov. 2, 2016.
Nicky Ouellet

Montana is one of the least racially diverse states in the country, but groups in the Flathead Valley are regularly meeting to discuss race and racism.

It’s Saturday night. I’m at the Unitarian church in Kalispell with 30 people, and they’re here to talk about racial tolerance in the Flathead Valley. It’s a hard conversation to have, it’s uncomfortable, but most of the people in this room, like Jennifer Stebbins-Han, think it’s important.

A high school homecoming football game on the Flathead Indian Reservation drew fans and protesters alike Friday night. A crowd of about 50 people amassed against the outer fence surrounding the football stadium during halftime.
Nicky Ouellet

School administrators in Polson are figuring out how to move forward, after pictures of two students wearing t-shirts with a Confederate flag and "white power" slogans to a school event garnered national attention last week.

Nicky Ouellet

A high school homecoming football game on the Flathead Indian Reservation drew fans and protesters alike Friday night. A crowd of about 50 people amassed against the outer fence surrounding the football stadium during halftime. They held signs and chanted “No more hate” across the fence.

Judith Heilman, executive director of the Montana Racial Equity Project says, "the Montana Racial Equity Project is all about education and informing people. And then motivating them to activate. To interrupt."
Mara Silvers

As it approaches its one-year anniversary, a Bozeman-based nonprofit is challenging people to talk about an elephant in the room: racism in Montana.

Over 200 people came to the Bozeman Public Library last week for the Montana Racial Equity Project’s first ever Race in Montana Community Forum.

The reality and history of racial prejudice in America is hard to discuss, and so we as a people and nation have largely avoided it. But over the past year, a series of police shootings of unarmed black men has changed that. People started talking, although sometimes at each other rather than with each other. The history of enslavement of blacks followed by a hundred years of the use of law to enforce second class citizenship adds to the difficulty of comfortable serious discussion. Wilmot Collins of Helena, Montana knows more about this than most people. Collins joins us this week on “Home Ground Radio”.

Joseph Grady & James Welch: Building A Face

May 19, 2015

Joseph Grady, who is Blackfeet, was adopted and raised by a non-Indian family near Seattle:

"I went to school to learn that I was brown, because skin color was not a concept nurtured by my adoptive parents. I wasn’t confronted by race as a child, not directly at least until I started school.

09/22/2014 - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has a long history of spying on African Americans including Nobel Prize winner Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The great writer Richard Wright, who was also snooped on, wrote the poem "The FB Eye Blues:" Woke up this morning/FB Eye under my bed/Said I woke up this morning /FB eye under my bed/Told me all I dreamed last night, every word I said. Racism and surveillance are closely intertwined. Today, state security agencies and police departments profile and target Muslims. Their organizations and mosques are infiltrated.