renewable energy

Former Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer
File photo (PD)

Former Governor Brian Schweitzer says Montana is well-positioned to help lead what he believes is the country's inevitable energy revolution.

"We're one of the 31 states that passed a [mandatory] renewable energy portfolio. Electricity that we're using in Montana, more than 15 percent of our portfolio is already from renewables."

Solar panel installation.
Wayne National Forest (CC-BY-2)

Update 06/08/15: In an earlier version of this story we misattributed a quote from Sen. Pat Connell to Rep Tom Steenberg. The story has been updated to correct this error.

A panel of state lawmakers is looking into a renewable-energy issue that died in the 2015 legislature.

The eight-member, bi-partisan panel will spend most of its time looking into “net metering”, the technology that lets electricity users get paid for contributing excess power generated by their solar panels or wind turbines.

Montana Students Compete In Energy Saving Competition

Jun 3, 2015
Missoula Sentinel’s Imagine Tomorrow teams pose at the Cougar statue on the campus of Washington State University where the competition was held the last weekend in May.
Denise Dowling

Some of the brightest young minds in the Northwest gathered in Pullman, Washington last weekend for a competition called Imagine Tomorrow.

Four hundred and twenty nine high school students from Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington are challenged to reduce the use of fossil fuels and promote clean, renewable energy.

Randy Stiles

As part of a plan to address climate change, a proposed 2014 EPA rule would reduce carbon pollution from existing power plants nationwide by an average of 30% by 2030. (Montana's proposed target is 21%.) The EPA's Clean Power Plan has directed states to develop strategies to reduce CO emissions.

Eric Whitney

The start of the 2015 Legislative session is still seven weeks away, but a group of Democratic lawmakers, scientists, and activists is already working to frame a possible legislative debate on climate change. 

Among those who spoke at a climate change-focused news conference on Thursday was Dave Chadwick, Executive Director of the Montana Wildlife Federation. He says even without the EPA pressuring the state to cut its carbon emissions by 20 percent in 15 years, slowing or reversing climate change would still be a priority, to save the state’s hunting and fishing industry.

Katrin Frye

Anti-Keystone X-L Pipeline protests popped up across the state and the country on Monday in response to a recent State Department report. The report came out last week and stated that the Pipeline itself would pose no significant increase to greenhouse gas emissions.         At a protest in Whitefish Steve Thompson with Glacier Climate Action said they wanted to send a clear message against building the Keystone X-L Pipeline.