Ryan Zinke

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes have scheduled a public meeting on the proposed transfer of the National Bison Range.
Josh Burnham (CC-BY-2)

Debate over transferring federal public lands to state ownership or management has largely dominated Montana’s U.S. House race between the main party candidates.

Across the country, some state lawmakers and members of Congress are pushing to transfer federal lands to state ownership or control, a movement that has gained traction and created some controversy.

Incumbent Republican Ryan Zinke and challenger Democrat Denise Juneau both say their stances on these issues are clear.

“I have always been a strong supporter of public lands and have voted against the transfer or sale of public lands," Zinke says. "My position is known and well established.”

Denise Juneau says, “I remain 100 percent opposed to any transfer of management or selling of American public lands.”

The candidates have sparred over whether votes Zinke has taken in Congress, or Juneau on the state’s land board, are consistent with those statements.

Less talked about, though, is one case where the management of nearly 19,000 federally-managed acres in Northwest Montana could change hands.

Gov. Bullock's campaign has portrayed Greg Gianforte as a rich out-of-stater. Gianforte has been painting Bullock as weak on jobs. Are these arguments effective? We also look at how the issue of gun control always comes up in major Montana races, and why that is such an effective campaign tactic in Montana. Lastly, we discuss whether or not ties to the presidential candidates will hurt or help the Montana candidates this year.

The Montana Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians has sought federal recognition for almost 4 decades and tribal officials say they’re now the closest they’ve ever been to that elusive goal.

The House Natural Resources Committee yesterday passed legislation that includes federal recognition of the Little Shell tribe.

That’s the first time it’s ever made it out of a House committee.

Democratic candidate for U.S. House of Representatives Denise Juneau stumps on the state Capitol steps Thursday in a promise to end what she calls unethical campaign behavior in Congress.
Corin Cates-Carney

Democratic candidate for Congress Denise Juneau promised legislation to curb what she calls unethical campaign behavior in Congress Thursday, Sept. 8. Juneau is calling it the CASH ACT of 2017, which stands for Congress Abolishes Super PAC Hiring.

U.S. Capitol
flickr user Tim Evanson (CC-BY-SA-2)

A bill that Republican Congressman Ryan Zinke is pushing to lift the Obama Administration's suspension on coal leases on federal lands made progress in the House Thursday.

Challenger Denise Juneau and incumbant Ryan Zinke met in Billings for their second debate on September 1, 2016
DENISE JUNEAU: COURTESY BRONTE WITTPEN; RYAN ZINKE: WILLIAM MARCUS

Last night, for the second time in less than a week, the candidates for Montana’s seat in the U.S. House of Representatives met to debate, arguing policy and social issues, and making their case to voters.

Ryan Zinke and Denise Juneau debated on September 1 from the campus of Montana State University-Billings.
Denise Juneau: courtesy Bronte Wittpen; Ryan Zinke: William Marcus

Ryan Zinke and Denise Juneau debated tonight from the campus of Montana State University-Billings. A panel of journalists from Yellowstone Public Radio, the Billings Gazette and Cowles Montana Media asked questions of the U.S. House candidates. Listen the to full debate right here.

Ryan Zinke and Denise Juneau debated on September 1 from the campus of Montana State University-Billings.
Denise Juneau: courtesy Bronte Wittpen; Ryan Zinke: William Marcus

Tonight's debate happens at 7:00 p.m. on the campus of Montana State University-Billings. A panel of journalists from Yellowstone Public Radio, the Billings Gazette and Cowles Montana Media will ask questions of Rep. Ryan Zinke and Denise Juneau.

U.S. House candidates Denise Juneau and Ryan Zinke stand on stage at Frazer High School for their first debate on August 29, 2016
Jackie Yamanaka - Yellowstone Public Radio

The first debate between Montana’s major party candidates for its lone seat in the U.S. House was last night. It was colored by both national politics and the very local concerns of the community that hosted it — the tiny town of Frazer on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in northeast Montana.

Listen to the first debate between Ryan Zinke and Denise Juneau from Frazer, Montana on August 29, 2016.

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