MTPR

Sheila Hogan

Health Department Outlines Cuts To Services For Special Needs Kids
Corin Cates-Carney

The state health department is taking the next step to chip away at $49 million in budget cuts. That’s how much Governor Steve Bullock and state lawmakers told the department it had to reduce expenses at the end November’s special legislative session, in order to balance the state budget after lower than expected tax revenues last year.

More than 40 people came to the DPHHS hearing on Medicaid cuts Thursday, Feb. 01 in Helena.
Corin Cates-Carney

The Montana health department faced blistering public comment Thursday on their plan to cut more than $12 million from Medicaid services. Governor Steve Bullock and state lawmakers reduced funding to most state agencies to balance the state’s budget.

The roughly $12 million is part of the Department of Health and Human Services’ continuing work to cut $49 million in spending. That’s more than more than 4.5 percent of its general fund budget.

Shards of methamphetamine hydrochloride, also known as crystal meth.
Radspunk (GFDL)

Montana’s health department is now sharing with prosecutors results of drug toxicology tests conducted on children suspected to have been exposed to drugs. The Department previously didn’t comply with this state law because they said doing so would jeopardize federal funding.

Health Department Director Sheila Hogan gave regional Child and Family Services supervisors Tuesday the go-ahead to share those toxicology reports with county attorneys.

Opportunity Resources, Inc.

The state health department is cutting ties at the end of March with private contractors who help people with developmental disabilities.


State lawmakers are considering a plan to lift a block on nearly $7 million in state budget cuts.

In November, an interim legislative committee put a hold on a cut passed this year to the amount the state pays healthcare providers who take Medicaid. Now, some members of that committee want to lift that hold, meaning the pay cut would take place immediately, instead of in 2019.

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