MTPR

Steve Bullock

A levee on the Clark Fork River near Turah, MT eroded by floodwater, May 20, 2018.
Inciweb

Missoula’s historic flood season is still going strong, but the worst of it may be over.

First, the good news as delivered Monday by Missoula National Weather Service Meteorologist Jeff Kitzmiller.

Flood outlook for the Clark For River near Missoula.
National Weather Service

Western Montana’s flood waters receded a little bit Thursday, but it’s only a temporary reprieve. Warmer temperatures are on the horizon, and there’s more snowpack left in the mountains. Lots more.

Gov. Bullock Declares Statewide Flooding Emergency

May 2, 2018

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana Gov. Steve Bullock has declared a statewide flooding emergency. Wednesday's declaration allows the governor to mobilize state resources and the Montana National Guard to protect life, health and property.

Bullock says recent rainfall and rapid snowmelt have combined to cause rivers, streams and tributaries to rise out of their banks across the state.

Campaign war chests are growing, some more than others. One Senate candidate looks for help from disgraced General Michael Flynn, and Governor Bullock gets a warm reception in Iowa. Sally Mauk, Chuck Johnson and Rob Saldin look at these stories and the latest ads right now on "Campaign Beat."

The Latest: Montana Governor Declares Flooding Emergency

Apr 18, 2018
The Milk River is forecast to remain above Moderate flood stage into next week, possibly reaching Major flood stage for a time. Areas that have yet to experience flooding in this area may begin to see flooding soon.
National Weather Service Great Falls, MT.

HAVRE, Mont. (AP) — The Latest on flooding in Montana (all times local): 4:15 p.m.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock says there is a flooding emergency in seven counties and the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation.

The emergency declaration issued Wednesday allows the use of state government services and equipment, and allows the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers to help protect infrastructure.

The governor's office says flooding from rapid snowmelt has the potential to cause widespread damage to homes, farms and infrastructure such as roads.

Pages