MTPR

Steve Running

Dozens of fires burning in the Rocky Mountains in Montana were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on the afternoon of August 19, 2003. In the image, fire locations have been marked in yellow. The fi
Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Last week a senior advisor to President-elect Trump said funding for NASA Earth sciences work should be cut dramatically, or just ended. Former Pennsylvania Congressman Robert Walker made those comments in the Guardian newspaper.

For perspective on what that would mean, Amy Martin talked to the chairman of the Earth Science Subcommittee for NASA’s Advisory Council. The chairman is Steve Running, who is a regent’s professor of ecology at the University of Montana. She asked Running if big cuts to NASA Earth sciences have been proposed in the past.

Eric Whitney

Backcountry skier Ryan Swantner is willing to work hard to get in his turns, but lately he’s had to work harder than usual.

Sen. Duane Ankney (R) SD20
Montana Legislature

Tonight Governor Bullock’s proposal for how Montana can reduce C02 emissions from its coal fired power plants gets its first public airing at a meeting in Colstrip.

More public meetings will follow in Billings tomorrow night, and Missoula on Thursday. The administration is trying to meet a goal set by the Environmental Protection Agency for Montana to reduce C02 emissions 21 percent by the year 2030.

The state of Montana has a new set of proposed options for reducing how much carbon dioxide the state’s coal burning power plants release. Those options, released by Governor Bullock Friday, have won praise from both the Montana Environmental Information Center, and PPL, the company that owns the Colstrip power plant, which is the state’s largest C02 emitter.

William Marcus

As part of Montana Public Media's "Climate Week", climate change is the focus of our nightly features this week during Montana Evening Edition.

Dan Boyce

The first comprehensive report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 2007 will be released this week

Members of the Clark Fork River Task Force met in Missoula this week to discuss water supply and climate condition forecasts for this year.  In short the  hydrologists,  drought experts and others say the recent cool and wet spell has been an important counter-balance for the basin that's experienced several warm spells. Northwest Montana has plenty of moisture at the moment.  Southwest Montana - just like last year - is most at risk for dry conditions this summer. Edward O'Brien speaks with University of Montana School of Forestry and Conservation's Dr.