Stress

The Plant Detective
5:00 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Gotu Kola

6/7/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" For thousands of years, people in India, China, and Indonesia have used gotu kola to heal wounds, improve mental clarity, and treat skin conditions such as leprosy and psoriasis. Today, in the U.S. and Europe, gotu kola in ointment helps heal minor wounds and taken in other forms, it treats varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency. The Chinese use it to reduce stress.

Don't confuse gotu kola with cola or cola nut. They're completely different plants.

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The Plant Detective
8:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Rhodiola Rosea

5/17/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" The harsh living conditions of rhodiola, a plant that grows at high latitudes and elevations, might explain the strong protective compounds it produces. People of the Arctic used it in their folk medicine for everything from increasing endurance and fighting fatigue, infection and depression to increasing fertility, sharpening memory, and reducing the effects of aging and stress.

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The Plant Detective
8:00 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Astragalus

5/10/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" For centuries, the root of Astragalus membranaceus has been used in Chinese traditional medicine, usually in combination with other herbs, to support the immune system and fight fatigue. Today, researchers are investigating roles for astragalus in cancer treatment and heart disease.

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The Plant Detective
8:00 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Tulsi

3/29/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" “Holy basil” helps many ailments. It's sacred - dedicated to Vishnu - and has been cultivated by Indian people for centuries, as medicine for fever, digestion, diabetes, stress, and more.

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Radiolab
3:12 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Stress

1/18/2014 - STRESS - Stress may save your life if you're being chased by a tiger.  But if you're stuck in traffic, it may be more likely to make you sick.  This hour we take a long hard look at the body's system for getting out of trouble.  Stanford University neurologist (and  part-time "baboonologist") Dr. Robert Sapolsky takes us through what happens on our insides when we stand in the wrong line at the supermarket, and offers a few coping strategies.  Plus:  the story of a singer who lost her voice, and an author stick in a body that never grew up.

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