MTPR

Suicide

Efforts To Prevent Suicide Advance In Legislature

Mar 7, 2017
A package of bills aimed at addressing youth suicide in Montana is working its way through the legislature.
File Photo (PD)

A package of bills aimed at addressing youth suicide in Montana is working its way through the legislature. One of those bills, House Bill 381, would allow school districts to create policies and procedures for suicide prevention and response specific to their communities.

Montana Lawmakers Work On Suicide Prevention Legislation

Jan 30, 2017
Rep. Mary Ann Dunwell testifies on a bill at the Montana Legislature.
Freddy Monares/UM Community

During his State of the State address Tuesday, Gov. Steve Bullock said that he "cannot tolerate that Montana leads the nation in youth suicide."

"I am haunted by this statistic," Bullock said.

Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
PD

As Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services faces a proposed $93 million dollars in budget cuts in the wake of  state revenue shortfalls, the department’s new director says she hopes to maintain efforts to combat Montana’s high suicide rate.

Montana Lawmakers Consider Suicide Prevention Grants

Jan 24, 2017

Lawmakers are considering a bill that would award grants through the Office of Public Instruction to develop a district-wide system of support to prevent students from suicide.

House Bill 265 would require schools that receive the grant adopt and implement a suicide prevention plan outlined in the bill. 

Rep. Jonathan Windy Boy (D) HD-32.
Mike Albans

A group of bills moving through the Montana legislature aim to address the state’s high suicide rate. Legislation introduced on Monday would fund grants in Native American communities, where the suicide rate among kids is more than five times higher than it is statewide.

Montana Capitol.
William Marcus

There were two suicides in Great Falls over the Christmas holiday weekend. State lawmakers are bringing several bills related to suicide prevention in the 2017 legislative session that starts Monday.

A package of bills aimed at addressing youth suicide in Montana is working its way through the legislature.
File Photo (PD)

Western Montana’s major suicide prevention collaborative re-launched under a new name today.

Project Tomorrow Montana is the successor of the Western Montana Suicide Prevention Initiative which was founded in 2014. It operates under the auspices of United Way. The group of nonprofits, businesses, educational and public-sector leaders wanted to reduce Montana’s high suicide rate.

Two years later, it’s still high — double the national average — and shows little sign of subsiding.

Ida Follette(r) and her husband Darrell Follette speaking about the suicide of their daughter Chelle Rose Follette, aged 13, at their home. Taken Feb. 2011, Poplar, MT on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation.
Mike Albans

Montana’s suicide rate is nearly double the national average. In the last two years, more than 550 Montanans killed themselves. Twenty-seven of them were adolescents.

  The suicide rate in Montana is nearly twice the national average, and for years, has ranked among the highest in the U.S.

As part of the University of Montana’s Brain Initiative, internationally recognized psychiatrist and researcher Dr. John Rush will speak in Missoula on Wednesday. He’ll deliver a public lecture on why effective treatment for suicidality and depression is still elusive for so many.

Sen. Kristin Hansen (R) SD-14.
Montana Legislature

State lawmakers are criticizing the state health department’s plan for how to address the high suicide rate among Montana’s young Native Americans.

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