MTPR

University of Montana Bureau of Business and Economic Research

Griz football game at the University of Montana
flickr user MuddyRavine (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

A new report by University of Montana economists examines the impact of Grizzly athletics on Missoula’s economy. The study by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research says that between 2013 and 2015, UM athletics brought nearly $23 million a year into the university.

Big Sky Brewery, Missoula Montana.
Kelli Whithorn (CC-BY-2)

A University of Montana Business Survey says that manufacturers in Montana are optimistic about the year ahead.

Governor Steve Bullock gave an upbeat assessment of Montana’s economy today as he unveiled his office’s 2015 Economic Development Report.
Corin Cates-Carney

Governor Steve Bullock gave an upbeat assessment of Montana’s economy today as he unveiled his office’s 2015 Economic Development Report.

The Montana Healthcare Foundation says it's making grants available to support better healthcare for people with who have a combination of medical problems, mental illness and/or addiction.
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Growing demand for healthcare means that Montana is going to need 40 percent more healthcare workers in a decade than it has now. That’s according to University of Montana Economist Bryce Ward. He says that just to meet the projected growth in demand, the state will need 7,000 more healthcare workers by 2025.

Montana has seen almost seven straight years of economic growth now, and more is forecasted for the future.

flickr user Neetal Parekh (CC-BY-NC-2)

The latest unemployment numbers say the state jobless rate fell by a tenth of a percentage point in December to an even four percent. The national unemployment rate is five percent.

The Department of Labor and Industry says Montana added 10,200 jobs in 2015.

Patrick Barkey, Director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research
Courtesy UM Bureau of Business and Economic Research

Last week a study of what could happen to Montana’s economy under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan came out of the University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research. Opponents of the carbon dioxide reduction plan say it proves dire consequences. Backers of the plan say the study merely reached the predetermined conclusion of the utility company that sponsored it.

Patrick Barkey, author of the study and director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research joined us for an interview about it.

Colstrip power plant as seen in the early 1980s.
David T. Hanson (CC-BY-SA-2)

A study released Wednesday says that complying with President Obama's Clean Power Plan will cost Montana more than 7,000 jobs and more than $2 billion in wages and sales. Those numbers were quickly trumpeted by Montana elected officials who oppose the nationwide plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, including Attorney General Tim Fox, who has joined Montana to a multi-state lawsuit to halt the plan.

A University of Montana study funded by the state’s largest electric utility predicts dire economic consequences to the state because of the president’s plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The study is drawing sharp criticism from advocates of alternative energy.

Senator Jon Tester is meeting with local community and business leaders in Columbia Falls Friday to discuss job training for workers impacted by impending timber mill closures.
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Montana's timber industry is watching to see if Canadian lumber will soon flood the market. That's because a 9 year-old U.S.-Canada Lumber trade Agreement expired today.

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